Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is a Justice Correspondent for the Washington Desk.
Linda Fittante/NPR
Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a Justice Correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the Newscasts and NPR.org.

While in this role, Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Outside of her role at NPR, Johnson regularly moderates or appears on legal panels for the American Bar Association, the American Constitution Society, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and others. She's talked about her work on CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, PBS, and other outlets.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Society for Professional Journalists and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. She has been a finalist for the Loeb award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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Story Archive

Justice Department Launches Civil Rights Investigation Into Charlottesville Attack

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Special counsel Robert Mueller (left) arrives at the U.S. Capitol for a closed meeting with members of the Senate Judiciary Committee on June 21. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Lawyers Launch Initiative To Challenge Executive Power

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Justice Department Reverses Course In Major Ohio Voting Rights Case

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Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks at the Department of Justice during an announcement about leaks of classified information Friday. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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DOJ Announces Crackdown On Leaks As Intelligence Agencies' Calls For Probes Triple

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Deputy White House counsel Gregory Katsas is the leading candidate for the seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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During his short tenure, Thomas Wheeler made fighting hate crimes a priority, saying May: "Any serious effort to combat violent crime in America must include hate crimes." Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Sessions Has Long Shown Unwavering Support For Trump

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Former CIA Director John Brennan appears before a House hearing in May. He told a public policy conference on Friday that Trump associates should have known better than to meet with a Russian lawyer last year. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Attorney General Jeff Sessions testified on Capitol Hill last month that any suggestion that he colluded with Russia to interfere in the U.S. presidential election was an "appalling and detestable lie." Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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A protester holds up a sign during a July 11 rally calling for accountability regarding alleged collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russian government. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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'White House Arrest?' Legal Experts Disagree About Prosecuting A President

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