Carrie Johnson 2010 i
Doby Photography/NPR
Carrie Johnson 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a Justice Correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the Newscasts and NPR.org.

While in this role, Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Outside of her role at NPR, Johnson regularly moderates or appears on legal panels for the American Bar Association, the American Constitution Society, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and others. She's talked about her work on CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, PBS, and other outlets.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Society for Professional Journalists and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. She has been a finalist for the Loeb award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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A row of Secure Housing Units at the Corcoran State Prison in California in 2013. The prison has a separate facility built for inmates held in solitary. Robert Galbraith/Reuters /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Robert Galbraith/Reuters /Landov

"I would have thought the top drug kingpins in the country wouldn't be the beneficiaries of what we're trying to do here," Judge Royce C. Lamberth said, referring to sentencing reform efforts and guidelines that were designed to help nonviolent drug offenders secure early release. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Charles Dharapak/AP

Rep. Chaka Fattah, D-Pa., arrives at the federal courthouse in Philadelphia earlier this month. Fattah has been indicted on charges he misappropriated hundreds of thousands of dollars of federal, charitable and campaign funds. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Matt Rourke/AP

Last October, a 15-year-old student and member of the Tulalip Tribes in Washington opened fire at his high school with a gun obtained from his father. The tribe had issued a restraining order against the father, but that information didn't show up in the federal criminal database — so he was able to buy the gun. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Ted S. Warren/AP

The Justice Department indicted Sen. Robert Menedez on bribery and conspiracy charges earlier this year, and the lawyers in the case have been getting under each other's skin. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Andrew Burton/Getty Images