Scott Neuman

Writer/editor, Digital News

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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The Japanese supercomputer K, pictured in June 2012 at the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science in Kobe, western Japan. The K computer is currently ranked No. 3 on a list of the 500 fastest supercomputers. Kyodo/Landov hide caption

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Syrian President Bashar Assad speaks during his meeting with the heads and members of public organizations and professional associations in Damascus, on Sunday. Assad acknowledged that the fight against rebels had suffered setbacks, but vowed to win against insurgents. SANA/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Secretary of State Hillary Clinton testifies in January 2013 before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on the attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Georg Kapsch, President of the Federation of Austrian Industry, holds an issue of The Economist during a news conference in Vienna last year. Britain's Pearson PLC says it's in talks to sell its 50 percent share in The Economist Group. Heinz-Peter Bader/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Zachary Gallegos, 23, stands guard outside the Armed Services Recruiting Center on Thursday in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The Pentagon has asked such self-appointed "armed citizens" to leave, citing security concerns. Kevin Burbach/AP hide caption

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