Melissa Block 2010 i
Doby Photography /NPR
Melissa Block 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Melissa Block

Special Correspondent and Host

As special correspondent, Melissa Block produces richly reported profiles of figures at the forefront of thought and culture, as well as stories and series on the critical issues of our day. Her reporting spans both domestic and international news. In addition, she is a guest host on NPR news programs, and develops podcasts based on her reporting.

Great reporting combined with compelling storytelling is vital to NPR's future. No one exemplifies that blend better than Block. As listeners well know, she has an amazing ability for telling the important stories of our age in a way that engages both the heart and the mind. It is why she has earned such a devoted following throughout her 30-year career at NPR.

As co-host of All Things Considered from 2003 to 2015, Block's reporting took her everywhere from the Gulf Coast in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina to the heart of Rio de Janeiro; from rural Mozambique to the farthest reaches of Alaska. Her riveting reporting from Sichuan, China, during and after the massive earthquake there in 2008 helped earn NPR broadcast journalism's top honors, including a George Foster Peabody Award, duPont-Columbia Award, Edward R. Murrow Award, National Headliner Award, and the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi Award.

Block began at NPR in 1985 as an editorial assistant for All Things Considered and rose to become senior producer. From 1994 to 2002, she was a New York reporter and correspondent. Her reporting after the attacks of September 11, 2001, helped earn NPR a Peabody Award.

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Melissa Block reporting in China in 2008. She was on a reporting trip to southwest China when a massive earthquake hit, leaving some 90,000 dead or missing. NPR hide caption

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黄梅花, 18岁. 在2008年中国西南方的毁灭性地震中失去了膝盖以下的双腿。今年将要开始高中的最后一年, 这个地方让她学会英语, 参加 SATs (美国高考)并且希望有机会能在美国或者加拿大念书。 Courtesy of Huang Meihua hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Huang Meihua

Meihua and her parents shared a room at a temporary school following the earthquake. She's shown here with her mother in 2009, a year after the quake. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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M.C. Davis, former gambler and businessman, stands in his 54,000-acre preserve, Nokuse Plantation, in the Florida Panhandle. It's the largest privately owned conservation area in the southeastern United States. Matt Ozug/NPR hide caption

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Susan and Bill Dunavan own 80 acres of land in York County. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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Goodband compares these Knobbed Russets to shrunken heads. Others say potatoes or toads. They're all gnarled and warty and brown, but don't be intimidated: They taste great when ripe. They originated in Sussex, England, in 1819. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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