Melissa Block 2010 i
Doby Photography /NPR
Melissa Block 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Melissa Block

Host, All Things Considered

Melissa Block joined NPR in 1985 and has been hosting All Things Considered since 2003, after nearly a decade as an NPR correspondent.

Frequently reporting from communities in the center of the news, Block was in Chengdu, China, preparing for a weeklong broadcast when a massive earthquake struck the region in May 2008. Immediately following the quake, Block, along with co-host Robert Siegel and their production team, traveled throughout Sichuan province to report extensively on the destruction and relief efforts. Their riveting coverage aired across all of NPR's programs and was carried on major news organizations around the world. In addition, the reporting was recognized with the industry's top honors including a Peabody Award, a duPont-Columbia Award, a National Headliner Award and the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi Award.

Throughout her career, Block has covered major news events for NPR ranging from on-the-scene reporting from the Mississippi Gulf Coast in the days following Hurricane Katrina to a series from Texas gauging the impact of the Iraq War on the surrounding communities. Her reporting after the September 11, 2001, attacks was part of coverage that earned NPR a George Foster Peabody Award. Block's reporting from Kosovo in 1999 was cited among stories for which NPR News won an Overseas Press Club Award.

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Melissa Block reporting in China in 2008. She was on a reporting trip to southwest China when a massive earthquake hit, leaving some 90,000 dead or missing. NPR hide caption

itoggle caption NPR

黄梅花, 18岁. 在2008年中国西南方的毁灭性地震中失去了膝盖以下的双腿。今年将要开始高中的最后一年, 这个地方让她学会英语, 参加 SATs (美国高考)并且希望有机会能在美国或者加拿大念书。 Courtesy of Huang Meihua hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Huang Meihua

Meihua and her parents shared a room at a temporary school following the earthquake. She's shown here with her mother in 2009, a year after the quake. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Andrea Hsu/NPR

M.C. Davis, former gambler and businessman, stands in his 54,000-acre preserve, Nokuse Plantation, in the Florida Panhandle. It's the largest privately owned conservation area in the southeastern United States. Matt Ozug/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Matt Ozug/NPR

Susan and Bill Dunavan own 80 acres of land in York County. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Melissa Block/NPR

Goodband compares these Knobbed Russets to shrunken heads. Others say potatoes or toads. They're all gnarled and warty and brown, but don't be intimidated: They taste great when ripe. They originated in Sussex, England, in 1819. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Melissa Block/NPR