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Melissa Block 2016
Monika Evstatieva/NPR

Melissa Block

Special Correspondent and Host

As special correspondent, Melissa Block produces richly reported profiles of figures at the forefront of thought and culture, as well as stories and series on the critical issues of our day. Her reporting spans both domestic and international news. In addition, she is a guest host on NPR news programs, and develops podcasts based on her reporting.

Great reporting combined with compelling storytelling is vital to NPR's future. No one exemplifies that blend better than Block. As listeners well know, she has an amazing ability for telling the important stories of our age in a way that engages both the heart and the mind. It is why she has earned such a devoted following throughout her 30-year career at NPR.

As co-host of All Things Considered from 2003 to 2015, Block's reporting took her everywhere from the Gulf Coast in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina to the heart of Rio de Janeiro; from rural Mozambique to the farthest reaches of Alaska. Her riveting reporting from Sichuan, China, during and after the massive earthquake there in 2008 helped earn NPR broadcast journalism's top honors, including a George Foster Peabody Award, duPont-Columbia Award, Edward R. Murrow Award, National Headliner Award, and the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi Award.

Block began at NPR in 1985 as an editorial assistant for All Things Considered and rose to become senior producer. From 1994 to 2002, she was a New York reporter and correspondent. Her reporting after the attacks of September 11, 2001, helped earn NPR a Peabody Award.

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Terrence Johnson, a junior at the University of Mississippi, poses for a portrait outside his apartment in Oxford, Miss. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

A Student's Perspective On Mississippi: Beautiful, Engulfing And Sometimes Enraging

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Rowan Oak, William Faulkner's home in Oxford, Miss. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

William Faulkner's Home Illustrates His Impact On The South

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Kress checks the pigs for signs of weakness or respiratory distress. "[We] try to make eye contact with every animal, every day," he says. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Pig Farming In Iowa Means Dirt Under Your Fingernails And A Strong Sense Of Pride

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A family from California visits the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum in Independence, Mo. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Harry Truman Still Casts A Long Shadow In Independence, Missouri

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Big Brutus is the world's largest electric shovel. It stands 16 stories high amid the fields of rural southeast Kansas. The coal strip mine it helped clear of rock and dirt has long been shut down, and Brutus has been turned into a museum. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

'Big Brutus,' World's Largest Electric Shovel, Turned Into Museum

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Cheerleaders encourage the Independence Community College Pirates as they play the Coffeyville Red Ravens in Kansas. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Despite Economic Troubles, Residents Of Kansas Town Remain Proud

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The Rahimov family at home. Erkin and Limara with their two sons, Rasool, 7, and Murad, 16. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Uzbek Family Starts A New Chapter In Its American Journey

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With Trump Tapping Into Economic Fears, Wisconsin Turns Red For First Time Since 1984

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Frances Kolarek turns 99 next week. She was born three years before women won the right to vote. This election she cast her ballot for Hillary Clinton. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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View From Nearly 99: Frances Kolarek Reflects On Politics And Change

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A lighthouse built in 1858 stands on Loggerhead Key, Fla., an uninhabited tropical island. Artists Paula Sprenger and Carter McCormick participated in a monthlong artist residency here. Courtesy of Paula Sprenger and Carter McCormick hide caption

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Courtesy of Paula Sprenger and Carter McCormick

Making Art Off The Grid: A Monthlong Residency At A Remote National Park

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Surge Of Cuban Migrants Arrive On U.S. Shores

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Surge Of Cuban Migrants Arrive On U.S. Shores

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Cuban migrants Arnalbis Rogel (left) and Modesto Morales arrived on a boat in Florida on Sept. 7. Morales was the navigator. Melissa Block/NPR hide caption

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Improved U.S.-Cuba Relations Are Creating A Surge Of Cuban Migrants

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