Tailgaters enjoy the food before a Tennessee Titans-New Orleans Saints football game in 2007.

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Eating Meals With Men May Mean Eating Less

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In preparing the public for a disaster, officials want to make the right call, but they also want to avoid blame. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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To Dodge Blame, Officials Prepare Public For Worst

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Team USA goalkeeper Hope Solo fails to save Japanese defender Saki Kumagai's goal during the FIFA Women's Football World Cup final match on July 17 in Germany. Japan won 3-1 in a penalty shootout after the final finished 2-2 in extra time. John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Under Pressure, Soccer Goalies Tend To Dive Right

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Political Negotiations Also Shaped By Human Psychology

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The research is contradictory — some scientists claim violent video games, like Grand Theft Auto, have an adverse effect on young people who play them while others see no such evidence. Grand Theft Auto/Rockstar Games hide caption

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It's A Duel: How Do Violent Video Games Affect Kids?

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Residents check an earthquake-damaged house in Sukagawa city on March 11, in the Fukushima prefecture in Japan. A researcher says that after large-scale natural disasters, it's frequently friends and neighbors who are key to survival. Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Key To Disaster Survival? Friends And Neighbors

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Power May Increase Promiscuity

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