Is there an angel or a devil behind the mask? Scientists say it may not matter in terms of anonymous behavior. Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images

Abraham Lincoln, circa 1850. Lincoln was a political non-entity before he was elected. Why is he more widely known to history than the presidents who came immediately before and after him? Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Decision Time: Why Do Some Leaders Leave A Mark?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/163626172/163654761" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

What We Say About Our Religion, And What We Do

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/163527979/163527960" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Matt Langione, a subject in the study, reads Jane Austen's Mansfield Park. Results from the study suggest that blood flow in the brain differs during leisurely and critical reading activities. L.A. Cicero/Stanford University hide caption

toggle caption L.A. Cicero/Stanford University

A Lively Mind: Your Brain On Jane Austen

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/162401053/162551919" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

There's no industry standard size for food and drink portions, so it's hard to compare a Big Gulp with a McDonald's medium soda. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Joe Raedle/Getty Images

How Food And Clothing Size Labels Affect What We Eat And What We Wear

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/161770336/161796959" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
iStockphoto.com

Why Mental Pictures Can Sway Your Moral Judgment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/161440292/161459960" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An incentive system that gave bonuses to teachers upfront, with the threat of having to give the money back if student performance didn't improve, proved effective in one study. David Franklin/iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption David Franklin/iStockphoto.com

Do Scores Go Up When Teachers Return Bonuses?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/161370443/161391316" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Five Ways To Spot A Fake Online Review, Restaurant Or Otherwise

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/160755775/160989356" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Research suggests basic forms of learning are possible while snoozing. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto.com

Can You Learn While You're Asleep?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/160137395/160155221" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Don Nichols/iStockphoto.com

Are Independents Just Partisans In Disguise?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/159588275/159711616" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Megan Lutz, left, and Justin Chun react to amateur comedian Robert Lynch at the Metropolitan Room in Manhattan, N.Y. Lynch is an anthropologist researching what laughing reveals about us. Melanie Burford for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Melanie Burford for NPR

An Anthropologist Walks Into A Bar And Asks, 'Why Is This Joke Funny?'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/157592468/158185299" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Who's The Happiest? Researchers studied photos of Olympic medalists to learn who is the happiest. Here, bronze medalist Aliya Mustafina of Russia, gold medalist Gabby Douglas of the U.S., and silver medalist Victoria Komova of Russia pose after the all-around gymnastics final. Julian Finney/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Julian Finney/Getty Images

Would You Rather Win Silver Or Bronze? (Be Careful What You Wish For)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/157835076/157958811" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Can You Help Me Tie My Shoe? Researchers found that when study participants were asked an unusual request, they were more likely later on to perform a favor. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto.com

How To Manipulate People Into Saying 'Yes'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/157271465/157271453" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Ayodhya Ouditt/NPR

How Stereotypes Can Drive Women To Quit Science

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/156664337/156689258" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript