Research suggests basic forms of learning are possible while snoozing. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Can You Learn While You're Asleep?

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Are Independents Just Partisans In Disguise?

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Megan Lutz, left, and Justin Chun react to amateur comedian Robert Lynch at the Metropolitan Room in Manhattan, N.Y. Lynch is an anthropologist researching what laughing reveals about us. Melanie Burford for NPR hide caption

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An Anthropologist Walks Into A Bar And Asks, 'Why Is This Joke Funny?'

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Who's The Happiest? Researchers studied photos of Olympic medalists to learn who is the happiest. Here, bronze medalist Aliya Mustafina of Russia, gold medalist Gabby Douglas of the U.S., and silver medalist Victoria Komova of Russia pose after the all-around gymnastics final. Julian Finney/Getty Images hide caption

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Would You Rather Win Silver Or Bronze? (Be Careful What You Wish For)

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Can You Help Me Tie My Shoe? Researchers found that when study participants were asked an unusual request, they were more likely later on to perform a favor. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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How To Manipulate People Into Saying 'Yes'

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How Stereotypes Can Drive Women To Quit Science

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Traffic rolls past a speed limit sign in Ohio. Researchers believe they have found a new way to encourage drivers to stay within a safe driving speed: giving them a financial reward that diminishes as they speed. Mark Duncan/AP hide caption

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GPS Study Shows Drivers Will Slow Down, At A Cost

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How The Housing Industry Affects Students' Future

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Parents can make a difference in whether their kids become spenders or savers, studies find. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Listening To Parents Key To Financial Responsibility

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President Bush and then-Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry shake hands at the end of a presidential debate in 2004 in St. Louis. Researchers want to better understand why partisans' views of the facts change in light of their political loyalties. Charlie Reidel/AP hide caption

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Partisan Psychology: Why Do People Choose Political Loyalties Over Facts?

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Hank Aaron breaks Babe Ruth's record for career home runs as he hits No. 715 at Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium on April 8, 1974, on his way to a career 755 home runs. Research suggests that in a wide variety of professions, including collegiate and professional sports, a small but significant number of individuals perform exceedingly well and the rest of individuals' performance trails off. AP hide caption

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Put Away The Bell Curve: Most Of Us Aren't 'Average'

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Keith Ballard, right, of the Vancouver Canucks is tripped by Colin Fraser of the Los Angeles Kings for a penalty during game in Los Angeles on April 18. Researchers studying hockey penalties found that teams wearing black jerseys were far more likely to draw penalties than teams wearing other colored or white jerseys. Harry How/Getty Images hide caption

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Power (Dis)Play? Teams In Black Draw More Penalties

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Many Web users have little idea about how, or when, they're being tracked. In this 2011 photo, Max Schrems of Austria sits with 1,222 pages about his activities on Facebook — the company gave him the file after he requested it under European law. Ronald Zak/AP hide caption

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To Read All Those Web Privacy Policies, Just Take A Month Off Work

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Each year, millions of Americans don't fill their prescriptions because they can't afford to. Maya Kovacheva Photography/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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