Marian Grunwald (from left), Earl Elfstrom and Verna Matheson bounced a balloon back and forth with nursing assistant Rick Pavlisich on Dec. 13, 2013, at an Ecumen nursing home in Chisago City, Minn. Glen Stubbe/Star Tribune, Minneapolis St. Paul hide caption

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Glen Stubbe/Star Tribune, Minneapolis St. Paul

This Nursing Home Calms Troubling Behavior Without Risky Drugs

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NPR's analysis of government data found that harsh penalties are almost never used when nursing home residents get unnecessary drugs of any kind. Owen Franken/Corbis hide caption

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Owen Franken/Corbis

Nursing Homes Rarely Penalized For Oversedating Patients

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Antipsychotic drugs aren't necessary in the vast majority of dementia cases, gerontologists say. The pills can be stupefying and greatly raise the risk of falls — and hip fracture. iStockphoto hide caption

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Old And Overmedicated: The Real Drug Problem In Nursing Homes

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Jim Justice owns Southern Coal Corp., which has 71 mines that have racked up thousands of violations and millions of dollars in fines. Scott Halleran/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Halleran/Getty Images

Billionaire Spent Millions In Charity, But Avoided Mine Fines

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Outside the D&C Mining Corp. mine near Cranks, Ky. The company owes more than $4 million in unpaid safety penalties. Howard Berkes/NPR hide caption

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Howard Berkes/NPR

Top Delinquent Mine Has Deadly Legacy

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This photo of Roy Middleton working underground at the Kentucky Darby mine now sits on the mantel in the Middleton home in Harlan County, Ky. He was killed after an explosion in 2006. Anna Boiko-Weyrauch/NPR/Original photo courtesy of the Middleton family hide caption

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Anna Boiko-Weyrauch/NPR/Original photo courtesy of the Middleton family

Listen to Part 1

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Leif Parsons for NPR

U.S. Science Suffering From Booms And Busts In Funding

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Federal regulators are setting new rules for banks that offer deposit advances. iStockphoto hide caption

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Banks Come Under Fire For Filling In The Payday Loan Gap

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Federal Regulators Crack Down On Payday Advances

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