Almonds hang from a branch at an orchard in Firebaugh, Calif. Despite the strain of prolonged drought, in 2014, California farms sold $54 billion worth of crops like almonds or grapes, and animal products like milk. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Ah, sugar — we love the sweetness, but not the calories. For more than a century, food technologists have been on a quest for the perfect, guilt-free substitute. The latest candidate, allulose, is not available to consumers in a crystal form: It is a syrup only available to manufacturers. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ryan Kellman/NPR

In the years before the drought began, Australia carried out a giant reset of its water rights. First, the government put a cap on the total amount of water available for farmers. Then, farmers received shares of that total supply. Martin Benik/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Martin Benik/Corbis

Young pigs stare out of a pen at a hog farm in North Dakota. In coming months, consumers will start to see a new label on some packages of pork: Produced "without the use of ractopamine." Will Kincaid/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Will Kincaid/AP

A clampdown on contamination in growing fields has pushed out wildlife and destroyed habitats. Adam Cole/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Adam Cole/NPR

Final inspection of frozen blueberries at the Atlantic Blueberry Co. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

The hard part of making an egg replacement product is coming up with a substitute for the protein in egg whites. Wilson Hui/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Wilson Hui/Flickr

Lee Perry-Gal measures chicken long bones at the zooarchaeology lab, Zinman Institute of Archaeology, University of Haifa. Courtesy of Guy Bar-Oz hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Guy Bar-Oz

Cottage cheese peaked in the early 1970s, when the average American ate about 5 pounds of it per year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

Historic yogurt-making cultures held by Mirjana Curic-Bawden. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Dan Charles/NPR
Adolfo Valle for NPR

A bumblebee collects pollen from a flower. New evidence suggests climate change has left bumblebees with a shrinking range of places to live. Yuri Kadobnovy/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Yuri Kadobnovy/AFP/Getty Images