A test field of sorghum outside Manhattan, Kan., planted by Kansas State University. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

Heat, Drought Draw Farmers Back To Sorghum, The 'Camel Of Crops'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/231509864/242150647" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Warren Buffett (left), Howard G. Buffett (center) and grandson Howard W. Buffett collaborated on a book about the challenges of feeding more than 2 billion more mouths by 2050. Scott Eells/Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Scott Eells/Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The long arms of pivot irrigation rigs deliver water from the Ogallala Aquifer to circular fields of corn in northwestern Kansas. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

Kansas Farmers Commit To Taking Less Water From The Ground

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/230702453/239275577" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Patricia Whisnant, who runs Rain Crow Ranch in Doniphan, Mo., says her grass-fed beef can compete with the Australian product because it has a better story American consumers can connect with. Courtesy of Rain Crow Ranch hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Rain Crow Ranch

Why Lots Of Grass-Fed Beef Sold In U.S. Comes From Down Under

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/228659915/228923005" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Black soldier flies mate and lay eggs inside these cages at EnviroFlight. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

Making Food From Flies (It's Not That Icky)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/223728061/224152653" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Genetically modified to be enriched with beta-carotene, golden rice grains (left) are a deep yellow. At right, white rice grains. Isagani Serrano/International Rice Research Institute hide caption

toggle caption Isagani Serrano/International Rice Research Institute

A cornfield is shrouded in mist at sunrise in rural Springfield, Neb. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption Nati Harnik/AP

American Farmers Say They Feed The World, But Do They?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/221376803/223309072" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Piglets in a pen on a hog farm in Frankenstein, Mo. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

toggle caption Jeff Roberson/AP

Antibiotic Use On The Farm: Are We Flying Blind?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/216874940/216924333" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An irrigation pivot waters a corn field in Nebraska. Many farmers in Nebraska and Kansas rely on irrigation to water their corn fields. But the underground aquifer they draw from will run dry. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption Nati Harnik/AP

Turning Off The Spigot In Western Kansas Farmland

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/215831484/216006588" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Beef cattle stand in a barn on the Larson Farms feedlot in Maple Park, Ill. Daniel Acker/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Daniel Acker/Landov

Inside The Beef Industry's Battle Over Growth-Promotion Drugs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/214202886/214237519" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man cleans quinoa grain in Pacoma, Bolivia. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

toggle caption Juan Karita/AP

Can Quinoa Farming Go Global Without Leaving Andeans Behind?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/212342707/212370211" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Beehive designer Johannes Paul (right) and Natural England's ecologist Peter Massini, with a brood frame colonized with bees from the "beehaus" beehive on the roof of his house in London in 2009. Sang Tan/AP hide caption

toggle caption Sang Tan/AP