'Biotech Rider' In Budget Angers Opponents Of Genetically-Modified Crops

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/175722015/175721992" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Workers clear honey from dead beehives at a bee farm east of Merced, Calif. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Are Agriculture's Most Popular Insecticides Killing Our Bees?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/175278607/175302819" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Genetically modified to be enriched with beta-carotene, golden rice grains (left) are a deep yellow. At right, white rice grains. Isagani Serrano/International Rice Research Institute hide caption

toggle caption
Isagani Serrano/International Rice Research Institute

In A Grain Of Golden Rice, A World Of Controversy Over GMO Foods

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/173611461/173687766" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wild bees, such as this Andrena bee visiting highbush blueberry flowers, play a key role in boosting crop yields. Left photo by Rufus Isaac/AAAS; Right photo courtesy of Daniel M.N. Turner hide caption

toggle caption
Left photo by Rufus Isaac/AAAS; Right photo courtesy of Daniel M.N. Turner

Wild Bees Are Good For Crops, But Crops Are Bad For Bees

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/173167125/173217283" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Stewart Parnell (center), former president of the now-defunct Peanut Corp. of America, is one of four executives indicted over a 2009 outbreak of salmonella. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Former Peanut Firm Executives Indicted Over 2009 Salmonella Outbreak

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/172605596/172631875" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A corn field is shrouded in mist at sunrise in rural Springfield, Neb. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Nati Harnik/AP

Vernon Hugh Bowman lives outside the small town of Sandborn, Ind. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Dan Charles/NPR

Farmer's Fight With Monsanto Reaches The Supreme Court

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/171896311/172298281" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man buys meat at a butcher's stand in Moscow's Dorogomilovsky market in 2011. On Monday, Russia began blocking U.S. meat imports until those imports are ractopamine-free. Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP/Getty Images

Twins in Malawi helped scientists discover a role the gut microbiome appears to play in severe malnutrition. Photograph courtesy of Tanya Yatsunenko hide caption

toggle caption
Photograph courtesy of Tanya Yatsunenko

Gut Microbes May Play Deadly Role In Malnutrition

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/170645417/170692355" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

PepsiCo's product line ranges from salty chips and its sugary namesake drink to more healthful fare like hummus and yogurt. In 2010, the company announced plans to cut sugar, fat and sodium in its products to address health and nutrition concerns. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

How One Man Tried To Slim Down Big Soda From The Inside

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/169733003/170436030" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript