Customers order food from a McDonald's restaurant in Des Plaines, Ill. The company has promised to start buying "verified sustainable beef" in 2016. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

From the botanical to the economic, spring's iconic vegetable still harbors surprises. Sharon Mollerus/Flickr hide caption

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Sharon Mollerus/Flickr

Top 5 Ways Asparagus, A Rite Of Spring, Can Still Surprise

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The world is increasingly relying on a few dozen megacrops, like wheat and potatoes, for survival. Above, a wheat field in Arkansas. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Danny Johnston/AP

In The New Globalized Diet, Wheat, Soy And Palm Oil Rule

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Empty shelves where eggs should be at a Whole Foods Market in Washington, D.C. The store blames increased demand for organic eggs. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Chickens That Lay Organic Eggs Eat Imported Food, And It's Pricey

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Benny Bunting, a farm advocate for Rural Advancement Foundation International-USA, in front of one of his old chicken houses in Oak City, N.C. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

The System Supplying America's Chickens Pits Farmer Vs. Farmer

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Chickens gather around a feeder in a Tyson Foods poultry house in Washington County, Ark. April L. Brown/AP hide caption

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April L. Brown/AP

Is Tyson Foods' Chicken Empire A 'Meat Racket'?

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Allen Williams grows corn and soybeans for Clarkson Grain, which has been selling GMO-free grain to Japan for years. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

How American Food Companies Go GMO-Free In A GMO World

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Adam Cole/NPR

Should Farmers Give John Deere And Monsanto Their Data?

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After Grist's six-month-long series on genetically modified foods, some loyal readers accused the site of changing directions in the debate. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Soon after being sliced, a conventional Granny Smith apple (left) starts to brown, while a newly developed GM Granny Smith stays fresher looking. Courtesy of Okanagan Specialty Fruits Inc. hide caption

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Courtesy of Okanagan Specialty Fruits Inc.

This GMO Apple Won't Brown. Will That Sour The Fruit's Image?

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A dead carp floats in water near the shore at Big Creek State Park on Sept. 10 in Polk City, Iowa. Like many agricultural states, Iowa is working with the EPA to enforce clean-water regulations amid degradation from manure spills and farm-field runoff. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

How Mass-Produced Meat Turned Phosphorus Into Pollution

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Chris and Sara Guerre are among a growing number of farmers who have made the choice to rent land to farm instead of buy because of increasing property values. Zac Visco for NPR hide caption

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Zac Visco for NPR

Here's How Young Farmers Looking For Land Are Getting Creative

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