A line of fire turns brown grass into black earth. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

Fire-Setting Ranchers Have Burning Desire To Save Tallgrass Prairie

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/306227655/307627445" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wal-Mart is promising to drive down the prices of organic food by bringing in a new company, WildOats, to deliver a whole range of additional products. Wal-Mart/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption Wal-Mart/Flickr

Can Wal-Mart Really Make Organic Food Cheap For Everyone?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/304205632/304896383" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Backers of the new Open Source Seed Initiative will pass out 29 new varieties of 14 different crops, including broccoli, carrots and kale, on Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Plant Breeders Release First 'Open Source Seeds'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/303772556/304041910" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Live tilapia raised by Blue Ridge Aquaculture are loaded into a truck bound for New York. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

The Future Of Clean, Green Fish Farming Could Be Indoor Factories

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/298333029/300282940" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Farmers participate in a CGIAR climate training workshop on how to interpret seasonal rainfall forecasts in Kaffrine, Senegal. Courtesy of J. Hansen/CGIAR Climate hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of J. Hansen/CGIAR Climate

Customers order food from a McDonald's restaurant in Des Plaines, Ill. The company has promised to start buying "verified sustainable beef" in 2016. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Scott Olson/Getty Images

From the botanical to the economic, spring's iconic vegetable still harbors surprises. Sharon Mollerus/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption Sharon Mollerus/Flickr

Top 5 Ways Asparagus, A Rite Of Spring, Can Still Surprise

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/289607183/289837026" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The world is increasingly relying on a few dozen megacrops, like wheat and potatoes, for survival. Above, a wheat field in Arkansas. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

toggle caption Danny Johnston/AP

In The New Globalized Diet, Wheat, Soy And Palm Oil Rule

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/285335070/285581499" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Empty shelves where eggs should be at a Whole Foods Market in Washington, D.C. The store blames increased demand for organic eggs. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

Chickens That Lay Organic Eggs Eat Imported Food, And It's Pricey

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/283112526/283533747" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Benny Bunting, a farm advocate for Rural Advancement Foundation International-USA, in front of one of his old chicken houses in Oak City, N.C. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

The System Supplying America's Chickens Pits Farmer Vs. Farmer

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/279040721/279987840" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chickens gather around a feeder in a Tyson Foods poultry house in Washington County, Ark. April L. Brown/AP hide caption

toggle caption April L. Brown/AP

Is Tyson Foods' Chicken Empire A 'Meat Racket'?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/276981085/279405678" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Allen Williams grows corn and soybeans for Clarkson Grain, which has been selling GMO-free grain to Japan for years. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

How American Food Companies Go GMO-Free In A GMO World

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/269479079/271355343" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript