Writer Arlo Crawford (left) with his father, Jim Crawford, an elder statesman of the organic farming movement who dropped out of law school in 1972 to grow vegetables. Melanie McLean/Courtesy of Henry Holt and Co. hide caption

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When families give up farming and move away, it drains life out of small communities. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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In The Making Of Megafarms, A Mixture Of Pride And Pain

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David Ng (right) and Amanda Furrow, Customs and Border Protection agricultural specialists, inspect wheat for insects and alien seeds at a port in Baltimore, Md. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Hunting For Alien Bug And Seed Invaders At Baltimore's Port

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Allen Peterson's farm, near the city of Turlock, Calif., lies next to a concrete-lined canal full of water. He's one of the lucky ones. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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California Farmers Ask: Hey Buddy, Can You Spare Some Water?

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Farmworkers pull weeds from a field of lettuce near Gonzales, Calif. Salinas Valley farms like this one rely on wells, which haven't been affected much by the drought. George Rose/Getty Images hide caption

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California's Drought Isn't Making Food Cost More. Here's Why

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A fully formed coffee berry, left, is shown next to a damaged coffee berry due to drought, at a coffee farm in Santo Antonio do Jardim, Brazil on Feb. 6. Paulo Whitaker/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Double Trouble For Coffee: Drought And Disease Send Prices Up

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Wheat fields like this one could yield wheat with less zinc and iron in the future if they are exposed to higher levels of CO2, according to the journal Nature. Zaharov Evgeniy/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Less Nutritious Grains May Be In Our Future

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Miller with one of his cows. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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For Many, Farming Is A Labor Of Love, Not A Living

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A line of fire turns brown grass into black earth. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Fire-Setting Ranchers Have Burning Desire To Save Tallgrass Prairie

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Wal-Mart is promising to drive down the prices of organic food by bringing in a new company, WildOats, to deliver a whole range of additional products. Wal-Mart/Flickr hide caption

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Can Wal-Mart Really Make Organic Food Cheap For Everyone?

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Backers of the new Open Source Seed Initiative will pass out 29 new varieties of 14 different crops, including broccoli, carrots and kale, on Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Plant Breeders Release First 'Open Source Seeds'

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Live tilapia raised by Blue Ridge Aquaculture are loaded into a truck bound for New York. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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The Future Of Clean, Green Fish Farming Could Be Indoor Factories

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