Farmworkers harvest and package cantaloupes near Firebaugh, Calif. Gosia Wozniacka/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Gosia Wozniacka/AP

Wheat grows in a test field at Oregon State University in Corvallis. Some scientists believe that there's a chance that genetically modified wheat found in one farmer's field in May is still in the seed supply. Natalie Behring/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Natalie Behring/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Soil erosion after five inches or more of rain fell in one hour across portions of Western Iowa in 2013. USDA Natural Resources Conservation hide caption

itoggle caption USDA Natural Resources Conservation

Craig Rowles tends to his pigs in a barn near Carroll, Iowa. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

Crop consultant Dan Steiner inspects a field of corn near Norfolk, Neb. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

Cage-free chickens in Harold Sensenig's barn near Hershey, Pa., get to roam and perch on steel rods, but they don't go outside. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Gracie Shannon-Sanborn, 5, holds a sign as she joins her father Allen Sanborn (L) and members of Progressive Democrats of America at a rally in front of Rep. Henry Waxman's office on June 17, 2013 in Los Angeles, Calif. The protestors asked the congressman to vote against a House farm bill, which was defeated Thursday. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Whenever a steer or cow leaves a farm in Michigan or goes to a slaughterhouse, it passes by a tag reader, and its ID number goes to a central computer that keeps track of every animal's location. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Genetically modified wheat has been discovered growing in a field in Oregon. GMO wheat is not approved for sale in the U.S. Above, a wheat field in Arkansas. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Danny Johnston/AP

At Michigan State University's Clarksville Research Station, researchers apply pollen by hand to tart cherry blossoms, in order to breed new varieties. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Dan Charles/NPR