Piglets in a pen on a hog farm in Frankenstein, Mo. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Antibiotic Use On The Farm: Are We Flying Blind?

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An irrigation pivot waters a corn field in Nebraska. Many farmers in Nebraska and Kansas rely on irrigation to water their corn fields. But the underground aquifer they draw from will run dry. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Turning Off The Spigot In Western Kansas Farmland

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Beef cattle stand in a barn on the Larson Farms feedlot in Maple Park, Ill. Daniel Acker/Landov hide caption

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Inside The Beef Industry's Battle Over Growth-Promotion Drugs

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A man cleans quinoa grain in Pacoma, Bolivia. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

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Can Quinoa Farming Go Global Without Leaving Andeans Behind?

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Beehive designer Johannes Paul (right) and Natural England's ecologist Peter Massini, with a brood frame colonized with bees from the "beehaus" beehive on the roof of his house in London in 2009. Sang Tan/AP hide caption

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The label for the berry blend recalled in June because of pomegranates linked to a hepatitis A outbreak. Food and Drug Administration hide caption

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What Poisoned Pomegranates Tell Us About Food Safety

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Farmworkers harvest and package cantaloupes near Firebaugh, Calif. Gosia Wozniacka/AP hide caption

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Wheat grows in a test field at Oregon State University in Corvallis. Some scientists believe that there's a chance that genetically modified wheat found in one farmer's field in May is still in the seed supply. Natalie Behring/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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In Oregon, The GMO Wheat Mystery Deepens

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Soil erosion after five inches or more of rain fell in one hour across portions of Western Iowa in 2013. USDA Natural Resources Conservation hide caption

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Craig Rowles tends to his pigs in a barn near Carroll, Iowa. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Are Antibiotics On The Farm Risky Business?

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Crop consultant Dan Steiner inspects a field of corn near Norfolk, Neb. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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As Biotech Seed Falters, Insecticide Use Surges In Corn Belt

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Cage-free chickens in Harold Sensenig's barn near Hershey, Pa., get to roam and perch on steel rods, but they don't go outside. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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What The Rise Of Cage-Free Eggs Means For Chickens

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