Driscoll's, the largest berry producer in the world, now grows about the same quantity of raspberries and strawberries in Mexico as it does in California. Many American producers have recently expanded their production to Mexico. Mike Mozart/Flickr hide caption

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Mike Mozart/Flickr

Why Ditching NAFTA Could Hurt America's Farmers More Than Mexico's

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"Sell by" and "expiration" labels on food products may contribute to food waste by misleading consumers to throwing away perfectly good food. Now, two food industry associations are encouraging food companies to do away with these labels. Ryan Eskalis/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Eskalis/NPR

Cattle grazing in southwestern Colombia. This combination of nutritious grasses and trees, known as silvopastoralism, can increase farm production and aid the environment. Courtesy of Neil Palmer/CIAT hide caption

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Courtesy of Neil Palmer/CIAT

Mike McCloskey, his cousin Manuel Perez (left), and one of their co-workers on a beach at the edge of their new farm in Puerto Rico. McCloskey and Perez played on this beach as children. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Chasing A Dream Built On Dairy, This Master Of Milk Came Home

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Farmers and chefs looking for their perfect match at Bluejacket, a restaurant and brewery in Washington, D.C. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

'Speed Dating' For Farmers And Chefs: ISO A Perfect Local-Food Match

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Former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue talks with reporters after meeting with President-elect Donald Trump in New York in November 2016. He's Trump's choice for agriculture secretary. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Helen Dahlke, a scientist from the University of California, Davis, stands in an almond orchard outside Modesto that's being deliberately flooded. This experiment is examining how flooding farmland in the winter can help replenish the state's depleted aquifers. Joe Proudman/Joe Proudman / Courtesy of UC Davis hide caption

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Joe Proudman/Joe Proudman / Courtesy of UC Davis

As Rains Soak California, Farmers Test How To Store Water Underground

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Dan Charles/NPR

By Returning To Farming's Roots, He Found His American Dream

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Many large-scale farms rely heavily on immigrant labor. And many farmers are opposed to Donald Trump's strong stance against illegal immigrant. Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Antibiotic- and growth-hormone-free cattle gather at a farm in Yamhill, Ore. Despite farmers pledging to reduce or stop antibiotics use, a new report finds that sales of antibiotics for use on farms are going up. Don Ryan/AP hide caption

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Don Ryan/AP

Companies are selling "milk" derived from a wide variety of plants. The dairy industry isn't happy about it. Bob Chamberlin/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Bob Chamberlin/LA Times via Getty Images

Soy, Almond, Coconut: If It's Not From A Cow, Can You Legally Call It Milk?

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Seaweed farms like this one on Nusa Lembongan Island, in Indonesia, are the main sources of carrageenan. Paul Kennedy/Getty Images/Lonely Planet Image hide caption

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Paul Kennedy/Getty Images/Lonely Planet Image

Carrageenan Backlash: Food Firms Are Ousting A Popular Additive

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