Berkeley, Calif., passed the nation's first soda tax in 2014. According to a new study, the tax has succeeded in cutting consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. But there's uncertainty about whether the effect will be permanent. Robert Galbraith/Reuters hide caption

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Berkeley's Soda Tax Appears To Cut Consumption Of Sugary Drinks

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Soda Tax Drives Down Sales In Berkeley, Calif.

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To protest against the falling prices of dairy and meat, farmers pour liters of milk in front of a prefecture in northwestern France in January. Jean-Francois Monier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Non-GMO eggs. (this photo is for promo only, not for the page) Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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Organic Food Fights Back Against 'Non-GMO' Rival

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Monsanto Sold Soybean Farmers A Weed-Beating Tool They Couldn't Legally Use

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Cookie dough clings to the beaters of a standing mixer. The Food and Drug Administration is warning people not to eat raw dough due to an ongoing outbreak of illnesses linked to flour tainted with E. coli. Larry Crowe/AP hide caption

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Workers sort potatoes in the field, collecting small and large ones in different buckets. Each bucket weighs 30 pounds or so. A worker will shoulder that bucket and dump it into a flatbed truck hundreds of times each day. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Congress has passed a bill that will require food companies to disclose GMOs — but without necessarily using a GMO label on packaging. Companies would have several disclosure options, including using a QR code on packaging that customers could then scan with a smartphone to learn more. (Above) A sign at a July 1 rally in Montpelier, Vt., protests the bill. Wilson Ring/AP hide caption

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Congress Just Passed A GMO Labeling Bill. Nobody's Super Happy About It

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For Pickers, Blueberries Mean Easier Labor But More Upheaval

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A Caesar salad kit. Americans buy twice as many packages of bagged salad greens as heads of lettuce these days. Is the bagged stuff just as good? If it gets you to eat more leafy greens, yes. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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As Bagged Salad Kits Boom, Americans Eat More Greens

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The Senate on Thursday approved a measure that would require food companies to disclose GMOs — but without necessarily using a GMO label on packaging. Companies would have several disclosure options, including using a QR code on packaging that customers could then scan with a smartphone to learn more. (Above) A sign at a July 1 rally in Montpelier, Vt., protests the Senate bill. Wilson Ring/AP hide caption

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Sweet potato evangelist Maria Isabel Andrade drives around Mozambique in her orange Toyota Land Cruiser in 2012. She is one of four researchers honored with the World Food Prize for promoting the crop to combat malnutrition. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Perdue will study the effects of features such as perches in chicken houses. It hopes to double the activity levels of its chickens in the next three years. Business Wire hide caption

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In Quest For Happier Chickens, Perdue Shifts How Birds Live And Die

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