Dan Charles Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.

The teal blue area along the Louisiana coastline represents a "dead zone" of oxygen-depleted water. Resulting from nitrogen and phosphorus pollution in the Mississippi River, it can potentially hurt fisheries. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA/Getty Images

The Gulf Of Mexico's Dead Zone Is The Biggest Ever Seen

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Poultry Industry Ready To Change The Way It Handles Chickens

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"The goats are kind of cool," says former inmate Chad Redding. "The females are like dogs — they just want your attention." Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

What's It Really Like To Work In A Prison Goat Milk Farm? We Asked Inmates

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A sprayer covers a soybean field with an herbicide to control weeds. Scott Sinklier/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Sinklier/Getty Images

Damage From Wayward Weedkiller Keeps Growing

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Researchers monitored the health of these wild bees, from the species Osmia bicornis. They nest inside small cavities, such as hollow reeds. Courtesy of Centre for Ecology & Hydrology hide caption

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Courtesy of Centre for Ecology & Hydrology

Pesticides Are Harming Bees — But Not Everywhere, Major New Study Shows

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Soybean leaves showing evidence of damage from dicamba. Thousands of acres of soybean fields have shown this kind of damage this spring. Courtesy of the University of Arkansas hide caption

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Courtesy of the University of Arkansas

Workers spread "red vanilla" (vanilla that has been treated by special cooking) in the sun to be dried near Sambava, Madagascar, in May 2016. Madagascar, producer of 80 percent of the world's vanilla, has seen huge jumps in the price. It's one of the most labor-intensive foods on Earth. Rijasolo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rijasolo/AFP/Getty Images

Our Love Of 'All Natural' Is Causing A Vanilla Shortage

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Buried machinery in barn lot in Dallas, S.D., during the Dust Bowl in 1936. United States Department of Agriculture/Wikipedia hide caption

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United States Department of Agriculture/Wikipedia

U.S. Pays Farmers Billions To Save The Soil. But It's Blowing Away

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Journalist Chris Clayton writes for an audience filled with climate skeptics: farmers and leaders of agricultural businesses. He's telling them that a changing climate will disrupt their lives. Courtesy of Chris Clayton hide caption

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Courtesy of Chris Clayton

A tractor pulls a planter while distributing corn seed on a field in Malden, Ill. Two scientists agree that pesticide-laden dust from planting equipment kills bees. But they're proposing different solutions, because they disagree about whether the pesticides are useful to farmers. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images