Jake Holt
Elise Hu
Jake Holt

Elise Hu

International Correspondent, Seoul, South Korea

Elise Hu is an award-winning correspondent assigned to NPR's newest international bureau, in Seoul, South Korea. She's responsible for covering geopolitics, business and life in both Koreas and Japan. She previously covered the intersection of technology and culture for the network's on-air, online and multimedia platforms.

Hu joined NPR in 2011 to coordinate the digital development and editorial vision for the StateImpact network, a state government reporting project focused on member stations.

Before joining NPR, she was one of the founding reporters at The Texas Tribune, a non-profit digital news startup devoted to politics and public policy. While at the Tribune, Hu oversaw television partnerships and multimedia projects; contributed to The New York Times' expanded Texas coverage and pushed for editorial innovation across platforms.

An honors graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia's School of Journalism, she previously worked as the state political reporter for KVUE-TV in Austin, WYFF-TV in Greenville, SC, and reported from Asia for the Taipei Times.

Her work has earned a Gannett Foundation Award for Innovation in Watchdog Journalism, a National Edward R. Murrow award for best online video, beat reporting awards from the Texas Associated Press and The Austin Chronicle once dubiously named her the "Best TV Reporter Who Can Write."

Outside of work, Hu has taught digital journalism at Northwestern University and Georgetown University's journalism schools and serves as a guest co-host for TWIT.tv's program, Tech News Today. She's also an adviser to the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, where she keeps up with emerging media and technology as a panelist for the Knight News Challenge.

Elise Hu can be reached by e-mail at ehu (at) npr (dot) org as well as via the social media links, above.

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Jay Y. Lee, vice chairman of Samsung, arrives at the Seoul Central District Court on January 18. A judge said there wasn't enough evidence for his arrest on bribery charges. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

J.Y. Lee, vice chairman of Samsung Electronics, arrives at the office of the independent counsel last Thursday in Seoul, South Korea. Prosecutors are now seeking an arrest warrant for Lee. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Arrest Warrant Sought For Samsung Heir In S. Korean Presidential Bribery Scandal

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Renho Murata, the leader of Japan's main opposition Democratic Party. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Women Are Making Their Voices Heard In Male-Dominated Japanese Politics

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Workers in Seoul's Yongsan ward office wait in a parking garage for an all-clear sign during a recent air raid drill. Concerned about a possible attack by North Korea, the South Koreans hold the drills twice a year. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

In S. Korea, Air Raid Drills Are A Reminder Of N. Korean Threat

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The Asiatic black bear is now an endangered species, after being captured in the wild and farmed for its bile. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

Bears That Inspired 'Adorable' Korean Paralympic Mascot Live In Caged Captivity

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South Korea Welcomes 2017 With More Political Uncertainty

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Obama, Abe Memorialize The Dead In 1941 Pearl Harbor Attack

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In Show Of Reconciliation, Japan's Leader Visits Pearl Harbor

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South Korea's President Park Geun-Hye attends an emergency Cabinet meeting on Friday in Seoul. Getty Images hide caption

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South Korea Impeaches President, But Political Drama Isn't Finished

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South Korean President Park Geun-hye is shown during a Nov. 29 televised address. The country's first female leader was impeached on Friday. AP hide caption

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AP

South Korean Lawmakers Vote Overwhelmingly To Impeach President

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South Korean President Park Geun-Hye bows during an address to the nation, at the presidential Blue House in Seoul last month. Park said she is willing to stand down early and would let parliament decide on her fate. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Vote To Impeach South Korea's President Expected This Week

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South Korean President Park Geun-Hye bows during an address to the nation, at the presidential Blue House in Seoul. South Korea's scandal-hit president said Tuesday she was willing leave office before the end of her term and would let parliament decide on her fate. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

More than a quarter of Japan's population is over the age of 65, and its birthrate is falling steadily. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Golden Years, Iron Bars: Japan Sees Rise In Crime By The Elderly

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This undated photo released by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency on Nov. 11 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un at a defense detachment on Mahap Islet. KNS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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KNS/AFP/Getty Images

How Uncertainty In The Korean Peninsula Could Be A 'Recipe for Disaster'

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