Elise Hu
Jake Holt
Elise Hu
Jake Holt

Elise Hu

International Correspondent, Seoul, South Korea

Elise Hu is an award-winning correspondent assigned to NPR's newest international bureau, in Seoul, South Korea. She's responsible for covering geopolitics, business and life in both Koreas and Japan. She previously covered the intersection of technology and culture for the network's on-air, online and multimedia platforms.

Hu joined NPR in 2011 to coordinate the digital development and editorial vision for the StateImpact network, a state government reporting project focused on member stations.

Before joining NPR, she was one of the founding reporters at The Texas Tribune, a non-profit digital news startup devoted to politics and public policy. While at the Tribune, Hu oversaw television partnerships and multimedia projects; contributed to The New York Times' expanded Texas coverage and pushed for editorial innovation across platforms.

An honors graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia's School of Journalism, she previously worked as the state political reporter for KVUE-TV in Austin, WYFF-TV in Greenville, SC, and reported from Asia for the Taipei Times.

Her work has earned a Gannett Foundation Award for Innovation in Watchdog Journalism, a National Edward R. Murrow award for best online video, beat reporting awards from the Texas Associated Press and The Austin Chronicle once dubiously named her the "Best TV Reporter Who Can Write."

Outside of work, Hu has taught digital journalism at Northwestern University and Georgetown University's journalism schools and serves as a guest co-host for TWIT.tv's program, Tech News Today. She's also an adviser to the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, where she keeps up with emerging media and technology as a panelist for the Knight News Challenge.

Elise Hu can be reached by e-mail at ehu (at) npr (dot) org as well as via the social media links, above.

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Kim Chol Ho, deputy manager of the Rajin port, in North Korea's Rason Special Economic Zone, looks out at small fishing boats. Despite stepped-up international sanctions, North Korea is still trading extensively with China. Eric Talmadge/AP hide caption

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The 'Livelihood Loophole' And Other Weaknesses Of N. Korea Sanctions

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Japan meteorological agency officer Gen Aoki displays seismic readings that are apparently a result of a nuclear weapons test in North Korea on Friday morning. North Korea later confirmed it had conducted its fifth nuclear test. Kazuhiro Nogi /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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North Korea Conducts Its 5th Test Of Nuclear Weapon

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North Korean restaurants, like this one in Vientiane, Laos, are run by the North Korean government as a way to earn hard currency. North Korea and Laos have had good relations for many years, but South Korea is trying to make inroads as well. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Laos: A Remote Battleground For North And South Korea

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Obama's Latest Stop In Laos Focuses On Younger Demographic

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President Obama announced on Tuesday in Laos that the U.S. will provide additional assistance to help remove unexploded bombs dropped by the U.S. during the Vietnam War. "Given our history here, I believe the United States has a moral obligation to help Laos heal," Obama said. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Obama Pledges To Help 'Heal' Laos, Decades After U.S. Bombings

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte arrives Monday in Vientiane, Laos, for the ASEAN Summit. The U.S. canceled a bilateral meeting scheduled for Dutarte and President Obama. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Obama Visits Laos; Cancels Bilateral Meeting With Philippine President

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North Korean restaurants, like this one in Vientiane, Laos, don't just serve North Korean cuisine. They are run by the North Korean government as a way to earn hard currency to send back to an increasingly sanctioned Pyongyang. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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A municipal worker sweeps along a pathway near the Mekong river, in the capital Vientiane, Laos. Manish Swarup/AP hide caption

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Tiny Laos Readies For A Visit From Obama — And A Turn Under The Global Spotlight

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The Galaxy Note 7 — shown at the IFA electronics trade fair in Berlin on Wednesday — is waterproof, as this demonstration was designed to highlight. But it turns out users might have another reason to drop it in water: Several dozen users have seen their phones catch fire, or even explode. Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Samsung Recalls Galaxy Note 7 Over Exploding, Burning Batteries

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Kim Su-an plays a little girl trying to get to her mother on an ill-fated train. Next Entertainment World hide caption

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S. Korea's Hit Zombie Film Is Also A Searing Critique Of Korean Society

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Two Chinese divers from the People's Liberation Army Navy are suited up and prepared to observe U.S. Navy divers in an underwater welding exercise. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Rising Tensions? Yes, But The U.S. And Chinese Navies Are Training Together

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Boys ranging from six to 12 prepare their flags for the Shimadachi Hadaka Matsuri, an annual festival rooted in Shinto tradition in which the children parade through town to ward off evil spirits and pay respects to the god of health. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Japanese 'Naked' Festivals Keep Centuries-Old Tradition Alive

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Pedestrians in Tokyo watch as Emperor Akihito speaks to the nation. In the rare video message, Akihito said old age and illness may make it difficult for him to fulfill his public duties. Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images hide caption

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In A Rare Speech, Japan's Emperor Hints At Abdicating

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