Elise Hu i
Jake Holt
Elise Hu
Jake Holt

Elise Hu

International Correspondent, Seoul, South Korea

Elise Hu is an award-winning correspondent assigned to NPR's newest international bureau, in Seoul, South Korea. She's responsible for covering geopolitics, business and life in both Koreas and Japan. She previously covered the intersection of technology and culture for the network's on-air, online and multimedia platforms.

Hu joined NPR in 2011 to coordinate the digital development and editorial vision for the StateImpact network, a state government reporting project focused on member stations.

Before joining NPR, she was one of the founding reporters at The Texas Tribune, a non-profit digital news startup devoted to politics and public policy. While at the Tribune, Hu oversaw television partnerships and multimedia projects; contributed to The New York Times' expanded Texas coverage and pushed for editorial innovation across platforms.

An honors graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia's School of Journalism, she previously worked as the state political reporter for KVUE-TV in Austin, WYFF-TV in Greenville, SC, and reported from Asia for the Taipei Times.

Her work has earned a Gannett Foundation Award for Innovation in Watchdog Journalism, a National Edward R. Murrow award for best online video, beat reporting awards from the Texas Associated Press and The Austin Chronicle once dubiously named her the "Best TV Reporter Who Can Write."

Outside of work, Hu has taught digital journalism at Northwestern University and Georgetown University's journalism schools and serves as a guest co-host for TWIT.tv's program, Tech News Today. She's also an adviser to the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, where she keeps up with emerging media and technology as a panelist for the Knight News Challenge.

Elise Hu can be reached by e-mail at ehu (at) npr (dot) org as well as via the social media links, above.

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Dallas Police Chief David Brown pauses at a prayer vigil following the deaths of five police officers last night during a Black Lives Matter march. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Ambush In Dallas: What We Know Friday

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Dallas police detain a driver after several police officers were shot Thursday evening in downtown Dallas. Snipers shot police officers — killing several — during a peaceful protest, the city's police chief said at a news conference. L.M. Otero/AP hide caption

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South Koreans leave notes at an exit of Gangnam subway station in Seoul. It was turned into a makeshift memorial for a 23-year-old woman who was stabbed to death by a male stranger. Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Violent Crimes Prompt Soul-Searching In Korea About Treatment Of Women

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A Japanese mother and her 2-year-old pick up free groceries in Tokyo at the charity Second Harvest. Japan has a limited safety net for the poor and the economy is still struggling to gain traction under Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Halfway Around The World, Brexit Hits Japan's Already Soft Economy

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The eighth and ninth graders at a recent Unification Leader Camp in Jeju, South Korea, answer questions about their knowledge of their neighbors to the North. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Yes, There's A Summer Camp Dedicated To Learning About North Korea

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China's President Xi Jinping, left, speaks from the stage with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, right, and U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew, center, during the opening ceremony of the 8th U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogues. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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In U.S.-China Talks, The Metaphors Flow Freely

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China's President Xi Jinping (right), chats with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (center), and U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew during the joint opening ceremony of the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogues in Beijing on Monday. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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A Rocky Time In U.S.-China Relations As Leaders Meet In Beijing

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Buildings are seen shrouded in smog from the 102nd floor of Seoul's Lotte World Tower in December 2015. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Korea's Air Is Dirty, But It's Not All Close-Neighbor China's Fault

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Obama Advances Vision Of Nuclear-Free Future At Hiroshima Peace Memorial

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President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe lay wreaths at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima on Friday. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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President Obama's Full Remarks At Hiroshima

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Demonstrators gather in a silent rally to mourn the death of an Okinawa woman in front of Camp Zukeran on May 22. The crime is thrusting the opposition to the U.S. presence on Okinawa back in the spotlight. The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images hide caption

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As President Visits Japan, Okinawa Controversy Is Back In The Limelight

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"Multicultural Street" in Wongok Village features stores, restaurants and stalls that serve the international community. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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In Homogeneous South Korea, A Multicultural Village Hints At Change

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A North Korean man reads a local newspaper on Sunday with an image of leader Kim Jong Un. Kim said during a critical ruling party congress that his country will not use its nuclear weapons first unless its sovereignty is invaded, state media reported. Kim Kwan Hyon/AP hide caption

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N. Korea Wants Economic And Nuclear Expansion, But One Undercuts The Other

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A man in South Korea watches a news broadcast Friday showing file footage of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un. Speaking at a major gathering in North Korea, Kim declared "great success" in the country's recent nuclear test and a rocket launch. JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In A Major Speech, Kim Jong Un Trumpets 'Great Success' With Nukes

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