Elise Hu i
Jake Holt
Elise Hu
Jake Holt

Elise Hu

International Correspondent, Seoul, South Korea

Elise Hu is an award-winning correspondent assigned to NPR's newest international bureau, in Seoul, South Korea. She's responsible for covering geopolitics, business and life in both Koreas and Japan. She previously covered the intersection of technology and culture for the network's on-air, online and multimedia platforms.

Hu joined NPR in 2011 to coordinate the digital development and editorial vision for the StateImpact network, a state government reporting project focused on member stations.

Before joining NPR, she was one of the founding reporters at The Texas Tribune, a non-profit digital news startup devoted to politics and public policy. While at the Tribune, Hu oversaw television partnerships and multimedia projects; contributed to The New York Times' expanded Texas coverage and pushed for editorial innovation across platforms.

An honors graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia's School of Journalism, she previously worked as the state political reporter for KVUE-TV in Austin, WYFF-TV in Greenville, SC, and reported from Asia for the Taipei Times.

Her work has earned a Gannett Foundation Award for Innovation in Watchdog Journalism, a National Edward R. Murrow award for best online video, beat reporting awards from the Texas Associated Press and The Austin Chronicle once dubiously named her the "Best TV Reporter Who Can Write."

Outside of work, Hu has taught digital journalism at Northwestern University and Georgetown University's journalism schools and serves as a guest co-host for TWIT.tv's program, Tech News Today. She's also an adviser to the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, where she keeps up with emerging media and technology as a panelist for the Knight News Challenge.

Elise Hu can be reached by e-mail at ehu (at) npr (dot) org as well as via the social media links, above.

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People watch a news report at a railway station in Seoul on Feb. 3. North Korea launched a long-range rocket Sunday local time, defying international criticism. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

The North Korea Information Center in Seoul, South Korea, holds a vast collection of publications, videos and everyday items from the North. Here, North Korea Woman magazine features the classic propaganda art often seen in North Korea. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Elise Hu/NPR

Han Seohee (right) and fellow North Korean defectors Lee Gwang-sung (left) and Hwang Soyeon (center) are regulars on Moranbong Club, a South Korean talk show featuring North Korean defectors. "There's a lot of prejudice toward North Korean defectors in South Korea," Han says. "So I wanted to show South Koreans that we're living here and trying the best we can." Haeryun Kang/for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Haeryun Kang/for NPR

A uniformed tour guide gestures to tourists outside the War Museum in Pyongyang. U.S. citizens can visit North Korea as tourists. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

The Two-Way

North Korea Claims It Has U.S. Student In Custody

State media reported that the isolated nation has detained a student from the University of Virginia for "committing anti-republic activities."

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A South Korean soldier stands next to loudspeakers near the border with North Korea on Jan. 8. South Korea responded to the North's latest nuclear test by resuming the broadcasts that include news, criticism of the North Korean regime and pop music. Lim Tae-hoon/AP hide caption

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Parallels

Responding To Nuclear Test, S. Korea Cranks Up The K-Pop

South Korea is again blaring news, music and propaganda from banks of loudspeakers along the border. At a minimum, it seems to annoy North Korea.

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Young South Koreans in the Hongdae neighborhood of Seoul, the weekend following North Korea's latest announcement of a nuclear test. Haeryun Kang/for NPR hide caption

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North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves during a parade in Pyongyang, North Korea, in October. The country said it carried a successful hydrogen bomb text on Wednesday morning, but many analysts are skeptical. Wong Maye-E/AP hide caption

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Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe plays with children as he inspects a day care center in Yokohama in 2013. More than 20,000 Japanese children are on wait lists for day care. Kyodo/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Police use water cannons to block South Korean protesters following a large rally against the government in downtown Seoul on Nov. 14. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Reporting from a Seoul cat cafe, one of the many themed cafes in Japan and Korea. Haeryun Kang/for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Haeryun Kang/for NPR

Parallels

Reporter's Notebook: Settling In In Seoul

NPR opened a South Korea bureau in March. Correspondent Elise Hu offers her take on the wonder and the wackiness of life and journalism in East Asia.

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Ali Hakim performs in the main train station under Kuala Lumpur's most famous landmark, the Petronas Twin Towers. Malaysia's Tourism Ministry now provides support for buskers. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Hundreds of police officers outside Jogyesa, Seoul's top Buddhist temple, as a deadline passed for a labor leader holed up inside to turn himself in. Haeryun Kang/for NPR hide caption

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