Elise Hu Elise Hu is NPR's Seoul correspondent.
Jake Holt
Elise Hu
Jake Holt

Elise Hu

International Correspondent, Seoul, South Korea

Elise Hu is an award-winning correspondent assigned to NPR's newest international bureau, in Seoul, South Korea. She's responsible for covering geopolitics, business and life in both Koreas and Japan. She previously covered the intersection of technology and culture for the network's on-air, online and multimedia platforms.

Hu joined NPR in 2011 to coordinate the digital development and editorial vision for the StateImpact network, a state government reporting project focused on member stations.

Before joining NPR, she was one of the founding reporters at The Texas Tribune, a non-profit digital news startup devoted to politics and public policy. While at the Tribune, Hu oversaw television partnerships and multimedia projects; contributed to The New York Times' expanded Texas coverage and pushed for editorial innovation across platforms.

An honors graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia's School of Journalism, she previously worked as the state political reporter for KVUE-TV in Austin, WYFF-TV in Greenville, SC, and reported from Asia for the Taipei Times.

Her work has earned a Gannett Foundation Award for Innovation in Watchdog Journalism, a National Edward R. Murrow award for best online video, beat reporting awards from the Texas Associated Press and The Austin Chronicle once dubiously named her the "Best TV Reporter Who Can Write."

Outside of work, Hu has taught digital journalism at Northwestern University and Georgetown University's journalism schools and serves as a guest co-host for TWIT.tv's program, Tech News Today. She's also an adviser to the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, where she keeps up with emerging media and technology as a panelist for the Knight News Challenge.

Elise Hu can be reached by e-mail at ehu (at) npr (dot) org as well as via the social media links, above.

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Story Archive

South Korean soldiers participate in an anti-terror and anti-chemical terror exercise Ulchi Freedom Guardian exercise last year. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Fresh Threats From Pyongyang As Joint Military Exercise Begins

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Reactions Out Of China And Guam Over Exchanges Between U.S. And North Korea

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Residents go fishing this week near Tumon Beach in Guam. Some people on the strategically located island fear the president's rhetoric has exposed them to danger. Virgilio Valencia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Virgilio Valencia/AFP/Getty Images

Trump's Rhetoric Renews Debate In Guam: Is Being 'Tip Of The Spear' Worth It?

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People On Guam Remain Calm Despite North Korea's Threats

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At Mosa's Joint in Guam, island residents and military personnel fill up the bar for Thursday happy hour. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

On Guam, The Mood Is Calm Despite Being In North Korea's Crosshairs

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Morning News Brief: Tillerson Tries To Tame Tensions, Guamanians React

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UN Security Council Votes Unanimously To Impose Toughest Sanctions Yet

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British Ambassador to the U.N. Matthew Rycroft and U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley were among the unanimous vote to impose new sanctions on North Korea Saturday. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

U.N. Approves New North Korea Sanctions Over Missile Tests

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An armored Chinese police van is seen next to the Friendship Bridge on the Yalu River connecting the North Korean town of Sinuiju and the Chinese city of Dandong. China is North Korea's biggest trading partner. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images

Kim Hak-min, 30, is an electrical engineering student at Sogang University who fixes iPhones as a side business. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

How Steve Jobs Helped This North Korean Defector 'Think Different'

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People watch as coverage of an ICBM missile test is displayed on a screen in a public square in Pyongyang on July 29, 2017. Kim Won-Jin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kim Won-Jin/AFP/Getty Images

Analysts: North Korea Improves Its Capabilities With Each Missile Test

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Protesters demonstrated near Seoul's gay pride festival on July 15. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

For South Korea's LGBT Community, An Uphill Battle For Rights

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North Koreans enjoy beer and snacks last August during the Taedonggang Beer Festival in Pyongyang. The festival, the first of its kind in the country, was held as a promotional event for the locally brewed beer. Korean signs in the background read "Our country is the best." Dita Alangkara/AP hide caption

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Dita Alangkara/AP