Elise Hu i
Jake Holt
Elise Hu
Jake Holt

Elise Hu

International Correspondent, Seoul, South Korea

Elise Hu is an award-winning correspondent assigned to NPR's newest international bureau, in Seoul, South Korea. She's responsible for covering geopolitics, business and life in both Koreas and Japan. She previously covered the intersection of technology and culture for the network's on-air, online and multimedia platforms.

Hu joined NPR in 2011 to coordinate the digital development and editorial vision for the StateImpact network, a state government reporting project focused on member stations.

Before joining NPR, she was one of the founding reporters at The Texas Tribune, a non-profit digital news startup devoted to politics and public policy. While at the Tribune, Hu oversaw television partnerships and multimedia projects; contributed to The New York Times' expanded Texas coverage and pushed for editorial innovation across platforms.

An honors graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia's School of Journalism, she previously worked as the state political reporter for KVUE-TV in Austin, WYFF-TV in Greenville, SC, and reported from Asia for the Taipei Times.

Her work has earned a Gannett Foundation Award for Innovation in Watchdog Journalism, a National Edward R. Murrow award for best online video, beat reporting awards from the Texas Associated Press and The Austin Chronicle once dubiously named her the "Best TV Reporter Who Can Write."

Outside of work, Hu has taught digital journalism at Northwestern University and Georgetown University's journalism schools and serves as a guest co-host for TWIT.tv's program, Tech News Today. She's also an adviser to the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, where she keeps up with emerging media and technology as a panelist for the Knight News Challenge.

Elise Hu can be reached by e-mail at ehu (at) npr (dot) org as well as via the social media links, above.

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Samsung is the largest employer and premier place to work in South Korea. Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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To The List Of High-Stakes Tests In Korea, Add The Samsung SAT
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Shin Eun-mi was deported by immigration authorities in South Korea following an investigation that she broke the National Security Act. Shin Joon-hee/AP via Yonhap hide caption

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The North Korea Threat Keeps A Cold-War Era Security Law Around
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Dr. Hong Jung Geun, chief surgeon at Metro Plastic Surgery Clinic in Seoul (left), performs a pro-bono scar removal procedure on a former North Korean. Haeryun Kang/NPR hide caption

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How S. Korea's Plastic Surgeons Are Helping Scarred N. Korean Defectors
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A South Korean army soldier walks by a TV screen showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un with superimposed letters that read: "North Korea's nuclear warhead." The warhead was later jokingly dubbed "the disco bomb." Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Otto Frederick Warmbier, a 21-year-old American student, speaks during a news conference in Pyongyang on Feb. 29. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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South Korean professional Go player Lee Sedol reviews the match with other professional Go players after the fourth match against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo. Handout/Getty Images hide caption

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Achievement Unlocked: Google AlphaGo A.I. Wins Go Series, 4-1
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In a photo from March 2011, then-U.S. Ambassador to Japan John Roos visits the Tohoku region, hardest hit by the tsunami and earthquake. He and his team then started the Tomodachi (Friends) Initiative to help young survivors. Ben Chang/Courtesy of John Roos hide caption

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After Tsunami And Quake, A U.S.-Japan Partnership To 'Give Hope'
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Elderly women walk together down a road lined with temporary homes in Fukushima prefecture, two hours from the radiation-affected coast. Kosuke Okahara for NPR hide caption

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5 Years After Japan Disasters, 'Temporary' Housing Is Feeling Permanent
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U.N. To Vote On Sanctions Package Against North Korea
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An American soldier (right) from the First Armored "Ironhorse" Brigade of the 1st Calvary Division is among those who began arriving in South Korea in mid-January. They are replacing U.S. troops that cycle out in February. He's speaking with a South Korean soldier who's part of an integrated U.S.-South Korean division. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Welcome To Korea: 4,000 U.S. Troops Arrive At A Tense Time
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