Jake Holt
Elise Hu
Jake Holt

Elise Hu

International Correspondent, Seoul, South Korea

Elise Hu is an award-winning correspondent assigned to NPR's newest international bureau, in Seoul, South Korea. She's responsible for covering geopolitics, business and life in both Koreas and Japan. She previously covered the intersection of technology and culture for the network's on-air, online and multimedia platforms.

Hu joined NPR in 2011 to coordinate the digital development and editorial vision for the StateImpact network, a state government reporting project focused on member stations.

Before joining NPR, she was one of the founding reporters at The Texas Tribune, a non-profit digital news startup devoted to politics and public policy. While at the Tribune, Hu oversaw television partnerships and multimedia projects; contributed to The New York Times' expanded Texas coverage and pushed for editorial innovation across platforms.

An honors graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia's School of Journalism, she previously worked as the state political reporter for KVUE-TV in Austin, WYFF-TV in Greenville, SC, and reported from Asia for the Taipei Times.

Her work has earned a Gannett Foundation Award for Innovation in Watchdog Journalism, a National Edward R. Murrow award for best online video, beat reporting awards from the Texas Associated Press and The Austin Chronicle once dubiously named her the "Best TV Reporter Who Can Write."

Outside of work, Hu has taught digital journalism at Northwestern University and Georgetown University's journalism schools and serves as a guest co-host for TWIT.tv's program, Tech News Today. She's also an adviser to the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, where she keeps up with emerging media and technology as a panelist for the Knight News Challenge.

Elise Hu can be reached by e-mail at ehu (at) npr (dot) org as well as via the social media links, above.

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Story Archive

Illustration by CJ Riculan

Video: K-Pop Dance Routines Are A Workout For Body And Brain

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Illustration by CJ Riculan/NPR

WATCH: What Makes Japan No. 1 In Toilet Technology

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Video: That Time We Tried Pore Vacuuming In South Korea

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Video: Animal Cafes Are Cool, But Does A Raccoon Cafe Go Too Far?

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A United Nations propaganda poster from the Korean War era bears an anti-communist message. In South Korea, the propaganda turned North Koreans into beast-like characters. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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-/AFP/Getty Images

Why Do Some South Koreans Believe A Myth That North Koreans Have Horns?

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South Korea's ex-leader Park Geun-hye arrives at the prosecutor's office for questioning, in Seoul, on March 21, where she apologized to the people for her role in the corruption scandal that led to her impeachment. Kim Hong-ji/AP hide caption

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Kim Hong-ji/AP

Tillerson Talks Tough On North Korea During Asia Trip

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The U.S. has begun deploying the Terminal High Altitude Aerial Defense - THAAD - an anti-missile system meant to defend South Korea against attacks from the North. The first components arrived in South Korea last week. U.S. Forces Korea hide caption

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U.S. Forces Korea

A Long List Of Challenges Awaits Rex Tillerson In Asia

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