December 2013: A Tunisian boy waves a flag as he runs at a rally in Tunis, marking the third anniversary of Tunisia's revolution. A prominent member of the group that's credited with averting civil war in the country says the group acted "to give hope to young people." Zoubeir Souissi /Reuters /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Zoubeir Souissi /Reuters /Landov

Tunisia's National Dialogue Quartet, represented here at a news conference in 2013, won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for the group's contribution to building democracy after the Jasmine Revolution in 2011. Anis Mili/Reuters /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Anis Mili/Reuters /Landov

Volkswagen Group of America President and CEO Michael Horn testifies before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations on the Volkswagen emissions cheating scandal Thursday. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

FIFA's ethics committee has suspended President Sepp Blatter for 90 days, along with UEFA President and FIFA Vice President Michel Platini and FIFA Secretary-General Jérôme Valcke. Philipp Schmidli/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Philipp Schmidli/Getty Images

Doctors Without Borders President Joanne Liu (right) is calling for an international fact-finding investigation into a U.S. airstrike on one of the charity's hospitals. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images

The model of a DNA stands on a desk during a press conference to announce the winners of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2015 on Wednesday at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm. Sweden's Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich of the US and Turkish-American Aziz Sancar won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for work on how cells repair damaged DNA. Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images

An image from aerial footage of flood damage in South Carolina. SCETV/YouTube hide caption

itoggle caption SCETV/YouTube

The "Super-Kamiokande" neutrino detector operated by the University of Tokyo's Institute for Cosmic Ray Research helped scientist Takaaki Kajita win a share of the Nobel Prize in Physics, along with Canadian Arthur B. McDonald. Kyodo /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Kyodo /Landov