Bill Chappell Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two-Way, NPR's flagship blog. In the past, he has worked with Morning Edition, Fresh Air, and other shows.

Protesters gather outside the courthouse in downtown St. Louis on Friday, after a judge found a white former St. Louis police officer, Jason Stockley, not guilty of first-degree murder in the death of a black man, Anthony Lamar Smith, who was shot after a high-speed chase in 2011. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Jose moving west-northwest on Friday. Jose had been a dangerous Category 4 tropical storm, with 150-mph winds, and now it has been declared a hurricane once more. CIRA/CSU and NOAA/NESDIS/RAMMB hide caption

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CIRA/CSU and NOAA/NESDIS/RAMMB

Police surround the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills, which had no air conditioning after Hurricane Irma knocked out a transformer, in Hollywood, Fla. John McCall/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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John McCall/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images

Playing pool during a power outage from Hurricane Irma, Lisa Borruso used a headlamp to line up a shot at Gators' Crossroads in Naples, Fla., Monday. Millions of people had their power knocked out by the storm — and some outages will continue for days. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Hurricane Irma dumped water on towns and covered oceanside streets with sand in several states. Here, Amela Desanto walks on the sand-covered road along Fort Lauderdale Beach on Monday, as the storm headed inland. Andrew Innerarity/For The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Innerarity/For The Washington Post/Getty Images

Irma Recovery Begins; Storm Flooded Parts Of Florida, South Carolina And Georgia

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The projected path of Tropical Storm Irma, as predicted by the National Hurricane Center in its 5 p.m. ET Monday briefing. National Hurricane Center hide caption

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National Hurricane Center

Irma Weakens To Tropical Depression As Storm Buffets Georgia

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The deputy director of Miami's building department, Maurice Pons, said in a city statement that he "would not advise staying in a building next to a construction crane during a major hurricane like Irma." Here, a high-rise building under construction is seen Thursday in Miami. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Alan Diaz/AP