Bill Chappell

Reporter, Producer

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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Police officers in forensics suits search the grass on Parliament Square gardens outside the Houses of Parliament in central London on March 23, 2017 as the investigation continues into the March 22 terrorist attack in Westminster in central London. Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Former Donald Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, seen here last June, was paid millions of dollars to advance a pro-Russian agenda, the AP reports. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Former Trump Campaign Head Manafort Was Paid Millions By A Putin Ally, AP Says

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When two men who were born in Germany but whose families are from Algeria and Nigeria were arrested on terrorism charges in February, police displayed items seized in a raid. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Google says it will improve its internal systems and give advertisers more control of where their spots appear, responding to complaints about the pairing of paid ads with offensive content. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Martin McGuinness, seen here arriving at 10 Downing Street in central London last October for meetings in his role as Northern Ireland's deputy first minister, has died at age 66. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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"The policy of strategic patience has ended," Secretary of State Rex Tillerson (left) said Friday of dealing with North Korea. Tillerson is visiting South Korea; he's seen here alongside South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se in Seoul. Jung Yeon-Je/AP hide caption

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A House-approved bill would require a court hearing before a U.S. veteran is deemed mentally unfit to own a gun. Here, rifles are seen at a gun shop in Merrimack, N.H., last year. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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French police officers secure the scene near the Paris offices of the International Monetary Fund on Thursday, following reports that a letter bomb had exploded at the premises. Christophe Archambault /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Firebrand ethno-nationalist lawmaker Geert Wilders prepares to cast his vote in the Dutch general election Wednesday in The Hague, Netherlands. Exit polls suggested a poor showing for his party. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Geert Wilders, 'Dutch Donald Trump,' Takes Second Place In Closely Watched Election

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In a living room in the Westhoff family's house in the Dutch town of Marle, a woman fills out her ballot in Wednesday's national elections. The family also runs a bed and breakfast out of their farm house. Muhammed Muheisen/AP hide caption

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Voters leave the Kerkhovense Molen, a windmill turned polling station in Oisterwijk, south central Netherlands, Wednesday. Local media are reporting high turnout in the country's national elections. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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The CAFE standards that set fuel efficiency marks for the auto industry will be reopened for review, the Trump administration says. Here, vehicles refuel at a roadside gas station in New Mexico. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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EPA Reopens U.S. Rules Setting Vehicle Efficiency Standards For 2025

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