Bill Chappell

Reporter, Producer

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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Story Archive

After a young girl's lemonade stand in east London brought a fine of nearly $200, the local council apologized. Now the girl's family is calling on more kids to open their own stands. Matthew Mead/AP hide caption

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Matthew Mead/AP

San Antonio police officers are seen in a parking lot where at least nine people were found dead in a tractor-trailer that contained at least 30 others outside a Walmart store. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy says the sanctions will show those who work against America's interests that their "actions have consequences." Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc. hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc.

Army Sgt. 1st Class Ikaika Erik Kang is accused of pledging allegiance to ISIS on July 8 in Honolulu. Images taken from an FBI video and provided by the U.S. Attorney's Office in Hawaii show him kissing an ISIS flag (left) and holding it to his forehead. AP hide caption

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AP

An Afghan policeman holds a rocket-propelled grenade during an ongoing battle with Taliban militants in the Gereshk district of Helmand province Saturday. A U.S. airstrike killed 16 policemen in the area on Friday, local officials said. Noor Mohammad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noor Mohammad/AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. is planning to ban American citizens from traveling to North Korea, tourism companies say. Earlier this week, Korean People's Army soldiers walked past portraits of late North Korean leaders Kim Il Sung (left) and Kim Jong Il at the Korean Revolutionary Museum in Pyongyang. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

Body camera footage of a Baltimore police operation released by the public defender's office appears to show an officer hiding drugs and later discovering them. Baltimore Police Department hide caption

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Baltimore Police Department

Internet personality Jake Paul is not being a thoughtful neighbor, according to residents who say his rental house has been the scene of fires and loud antics. Rich Fury/Getty Images for H&M hide caption

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Rich Fury/Getty Images for H&M

Britain's new rule seeks to prevent steep fees — as much as 20 percent — from being added to customers' bills simply because they pay with a credit card rather than with cash. Matt Cardy/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Cardy/Getty Images