Bill Chappell

Reporter, Producer

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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Story Archive

Astronaut Peggy Whitson became NASA's astronaut with the most time in orbit Monday. She's seen here earlier this year in the Quest airlock of the International Space Station with fellow astronauts aboard the International Space Station. AP hide caption

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AP

The USS Carl Vinson, seen here earlier this month, is taking part in exercises with Japanese ships in the Philippine Sea. MC3 Matt Brown/U.S. Navy hide caption

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MC3 Matt Brown/U.S. Navy

North Korea Threatens To Sink U.S. Carrier; China Urges Restraint

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A GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast bomb strikes ISIS-K cave and tunnel systems in Afghanistan's Nangarhar Province, in a screenshot from video released by the Pentagon. U.S. Forces Afghanistan hide caption

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U.S. Forces Afghanistan

Central Command says an errant coalition strike killed 18 fighters from the Syria Democratic Forces. A member of the U.S.-backed SDF, made up of an alliance of Arab and Kurdish fighters, inspect the Tabqa dam on March 27. Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images

A lack of official coordination and the use of powerful weapons contributed to the casualties during a terrorist takeover of a school in Beslan, Russia, in 2004, a European court says. Here, people lay flowers and light candles at the school gym in 2009, marking the fifth anniversary of the attack. Kazbek Basayev/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kazbek Basayev/AFP/Getty Images

Officer Jonathan Aledda, shown in 2014, faces charges of attempted manslaughter for having shot and wounded therapist Charles Kinsey in July 2016 in North Miami, Fla. North Miami Police Department via AP hide caption

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North Miami Police Department via AP

For the third consecutive year, the Alabama Legislature is considering a bill that would let the Briarwood Presbyterian Church congregation, one of the largest in the state, create its own law enforcement department with sworn police officers. Anthony Izaguirre/AP hide caption

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Anthony Izaguirre/AP

Former President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad raises his hand Wednesday as he registers to run in Iran's presidential election next month. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Secretary of State Rex Tillerson shakes hands with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov at the start of their meeting in Moscow. Russia has accused the U.S. of breaking international law with its missile strike on Syria last week. Alexander Nemenov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Nemenov/AFP/Getty Images

John Stumpf, the former chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo, will repay $28 million to the bank over an improper sales practices scandal. He's seen here visiting the House Financial Services Committee last September. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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A "help wanted" sign hangs in a storefront window in Miami last month. The Bureau of Labor Statistics says nonfarm payrolls increased by 98,000 in March, far below analysts' expectations. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A picture taken Friday shows the damaged Shayrat airfield at the Syrian military base targeted overnight by U.S. Tomahawk cruise missiles, southeast of the central Syrian city of Homs. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images