Rob Stein i
Maggie Starbard/NPR
Rob Stein
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 25 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Association of Health Care Journalists.

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A lucky few stay healthy despite carrying genetic defects linked to serious diseases. What protects them? Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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How Do 'Genetic Superheroes' Overcome Their Bad DNA?
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Multiple Reasons Attributed To Lower Ear Infection Rates In Babies
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There are about 1,000 genetically engineered mosquitoes in each pot. Guilherme Trivellato of the biotech company Oxitec prepares to release them in Piracicaba, Brazil, in the hope of reducing the spread of Zika and other viruses. Catherine Osborne/for NPR hide caption

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How Could Releasing More Mosquitoes Help Fight Zika?
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Dr. Danielle Cruz attends to 4-month-old Davi Lucas Francisca da Paz, held by his mother, Eliane Francisca, in an examination room at the Institute of Integral Medicine Hospital in Recife, Brazil. Catherine Osborn/for NPR hide caption

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The Poignant Cry Of Babies With Birth Defects Linked to Zika
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A woman who is six months pregnant shows a photo of her ultrasound at the IMIP hospital in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, on Wednesday. Scientists are trying to figure out how Zika virus may be affecting fetuses. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Study Finds Multiple Problems In Fetuses Exposed To Zika Virus
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Lindomar Pena, a virologist at a lab in Recife, Brazil, holds a box of vials used to store samples of the Zika virus in huge freezers. Catherine Osborn/For NPR hide caption

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Reporting On The Zika Virus Means Getting Up Close And Personal
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Marcia Andrade, an agent from Brazil's Ministry of Health, interviews Camila Alves, 22. A friend holds Alves' 2-month-old daughter. Catherine Osborn for NPR hide caption

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Disease Detectives In Brazil Go Door-To-Door To Solve Zika Mystery
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CDC Arrives In Brazil To Investigate Spread Of Zika Virus
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Mylene Helena Ferraira of Recife, Brazil, carries her 5-month-old son, David Henrique Ferreira, who was born with microcephaly. She's returning home after a medical visit. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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CDC Arrives In Brazil To Investigate Zika Outbreak
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Popular Heartburn Pills Can Be Hard To Stop, And May Be Risky
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Scientists have the ability to use DNA from three adults to make one embryo. But should they? A. Dudzinski/Science Source hide caption

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Babies With Genes From 3 People Could Be Ethical, Panel Says
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British Scientists Gain Approval To Edit DNA In Human Embryos
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When a baby is born by cesarean section, she misses out on Mom's microbes in the birth canal. Sarah Small/Getty Images hide caption

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Researchers Test Microbe Wipe To Promote Babies' Health After C-Sections
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