FDA Tells Company To Stop Selling Genetic Test

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FDA Tells Google-Backed 23andMe To Stop Selling DNA Test

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Princeton To Use New Meningitis Vaccine To Stem Campus Outbreak

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Gut Bacteria Might Guide The Workings Of Our Minds

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He's not just getting a cold. He's building his microbiome. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Say hello to your microbiome, Rob Stein. Our intrepid correspondent decided to get his gut bacteria analyzed. Now he's wondering if he needs to eat more garlic and onions. Morgan Walker/NPR hide caption

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Getting Your Microbes Analyzed Raises Big Privacy Issues

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Hydrocodone, sold as Vicodin and other brand names, may face tighter restrictions on prescribing and use. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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This micrograph shows a single mitochondrion (yellow), one of many little energy factories inside a cell. Keith R. Porter/Science Source hide caption

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Proposed Treatment To Fix Genetic Diseases Raises Ethical Issues

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Knight (left) and Bucheli take soil samples from beneath one of the decomposing bodies. Katie Hayes Luke for NPR hide caption

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Could Detectives Use Microbes To Solve Murders?

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The Eagle Mountain Church in Newark, Texas, was linked to at least 21 cases of measles this year, mostly in children. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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Drug overdose deaths have more than tripled in the U.S. since 1990. Opioid painkillers like OxyContin are the cause of three-quarters of those deaths. Toby Talbot/Associated Press hide caption

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Billie Iverson, 86, of Cranston, R.I., recently underwent a transplant of intestinal microbes that likely saved her life. Ryan T. Conaty for NPR hide caption

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Microbe Transplants Treat Some Diseases That Drugs Can't Fix

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We may not see them, but we need them. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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From Birth, Our Microbes Become As Personal As A Fingerprint

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