Secretary Clinton Hospitalized With Blood Clot

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The number of new drug shortages each year in the U.S., from 2001 through Dec. 21, 2012. University of Utah hide caption

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How A Drug Shortage Hiked Relapse Risks For Lymphoma Patients

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Doctors use tissue slides like this one of the ovary's outer cortex to confirm a woman's ovarian reserve. It's also the the ovary tissue that's removed in an ovarian transplant. Courtesy of the Infertility Center of St. Louis hide caption

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Chance To Pause Biological Clock With Ovarian Transplant Stirs Debate

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When researchers looked at the genetic sequences of 179 individuals, they found far more defects in the patterns of As, Ts, Gs, and Cs than they expected. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Perfection Is Skin Deep: Everyone Has Flawed Genes

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By sequencing a newborn's genome, doctors could screen for more genetic conditions. But parents could be confronted with confusing or ambiguous data about their baby's health. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Genome Sequencing For Babies Brings Knowledge And Conflicts

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New England Compounding Center co-owner Barry Cadden went to Capitol Hill for a congressional hearing Wednesday on the fungal meningitis outbreak. Choosing to take the Fifth Amendment, Cadden did not testify. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Lawmakers Clash With FDA Over Meningitis Outbreak

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People look at homes and businesses destroyed during Superstorm Sandy on Tuesday in the Rockaway section of Queens, N.Y. Spencer Plat/Getty Images hide caption

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Sandy Leaves Long List Of Health Threats

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A Dare County utility worker checks on conditions along a flooded Ride Lane in Kitty Hawk, N.C., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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The Science Of Why Sandy Is Such A Dangerous Storm

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Radiation therapist Jean Etienne holds a range compensator, which shapes the depth to which the proton beam enters a patient's body to target a tumor. Rebecca Davis/NPR hide caption

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Pricey Prostate Cancer Therapy Raises Questions About Safety, Cost

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An image of researchers at Oregon Health & Science University removing the nucleus from the mother's cell before it's inserted into the donor's egg cell. Courtesty of Oregon Health & Science University hide caption

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Geneticists Breach Ethical Taboo By Changing Genes Across Generations

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Human embryos under a microscope at an IVF clinic in La Jolla, Calif. Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Freezing Eggs To Make Babies Later Moves Toward Mainstream

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Cloning and Stem Cell Discoveries Earn Nobel in Medicine

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Nobel Season Kicks Off With Medicine Prize

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Scientists Use Stem Cells To Create Eggs In Mice

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