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Ramon Maldonado-Cardenas grimaces as he gets a flu shot from pharmacy student Khoa Truong during a health fair in Sacramento, Calif., last October. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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The FDA hasn't approved a new weight-loss drug since 1999. In the meantime, Americans' waistlines have continued to grow. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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A House panel heard testimony about conscience and religious freedom Thursday from (left) Rev. William E. Lori, Catholic Bishop of Bridgeport, Conn.; Rev. Dr. Matthew C. Harrison, president, The Lutheran Church Missouri Synod; C. Ben Mitchell, Union University; Rabbi Meir Soloveichik, Yeshiva University; and Craig Mitchell, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Shannon Earle holds her new baby Kiera Breen Earle, moments after she was born at their home last year. Amanda Steen/NPR hide caption

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Sue Freeman, 78, checks her email at her home in Laguna Beach, Calif., on Saturday. She says her eyesight improved markedly since she received an experimental stem-cell procedure last July. Melissa Forsyth for NPR hide caption

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People stroll down a street in Montpelier, Vt., last summer. In 1995, 13.4 percent of Vermonters were considered obese. The figure climbed to 23.5 percent in 2011. The latest national data suggest the obesity epidemic has plateaued, however. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Obesity Epidemic May Have Peaked In U.S.

The obesity epidemic appears to have reached a plateau, according to the latest federal statistics.

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