Social worker Shannon Coyne and her husband decided against circumcision for their son, now 11 months old. The nation's most influential pediatricians group says the health benefits of circumcision in newborn boys outweigh any risks and that insurance companies should pay for it. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Pediatricians Decide Boys Are Better Off Circumcised Than Not

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Health officials say they're worried that one day there will be no more antibiotics left to treat gonorrhea. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Gonorrhea Evades Antibiotics, Leaving Only One Drug To Treat Disease

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CDC Warns About Reemergence Of Swine Flu In U.S.

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Christopher Doll releases fish into the water of a neglected pool to kill mosquitoes that might carry West Nile Virus in Concord, Calif., in 2009. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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West Nile Virus Makes A Comeback This Summer

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The white arrows in these two tumor samples point to a subset of tumor cells that are in a resting state. Nature hide caption

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Lab Findings Support Provocative Theory On Cancer 'Enemy' Within

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Pedometer, an app, keeps track of your steps, distance traveled and calories burned. Benjamin Morris/NPR hide caption

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When Does An App Need FDA's Blessing?

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Human embryos under a microscope at an IVF clinic in La Jolla, Calif. Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Can IVF Treatments Reverse A Woman's Biological Clock?

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FDA Approves First New Weight-Loss Drug In More Than A Decade

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Which one of these sunscreens would be considered safe and correctly labeled by the Food and Drug Administration? Not a single one. Safe sunscreens are SPF15 or higher, and the new rules require those with broad-spectrum protection to include the term next to and in the same style as the sun protection factor. Benjamin Morris/NPR hide caption

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Consumers Stuck With Murky Sunscreen Labels Another Summer

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Ayodhya Ouditt/NPR

Finally, A Map Of All The Microbes On Your Body

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A woman pours two tablets into her hand from a pill bottle. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Panel Questions Benefits Of Vitamin D Supplements

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Isabel Doran, 4, gets a CT scan at Children's National Medical Center with her mom, Veronica Doran. The X-ray radiation in CT scans raises the risks for cancer, including leukemia, a new study shows. Dayna Smith/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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CT Scans Boost Cancer Risks For Kids

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Amber Cooper lives in Modesto, Calif., with her 5-year-old son, Jaden, and her husband, Kevin. She had a liver transplant when she was 10 years old and has to take anti-rejection medication. Deanne Fitzmaurice for NPR hide caption

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Health Insurance Cutbacks Squeeze The Insured

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Karlton Hill, 15, was diagnosed with diabetes when he was 12. He works hard to manage the disease: He jogs and does pushups every day; he takes metformin is very careful about what he eats. Leslie Capo/LSU Health Sciences Center hide caption

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A Dire Sign Of The Obesity Epidemic: Teen Diabetes Soaring, Study Finds

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