A scientist holds a bioprosthetic mouse ovary made of gelatin with tweezers. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine hide caption

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Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Scientists One Step Closer To 3-D-Printed Ovaries To Treat Infertility

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It's not clear how living in a segregated neighborhood affects blood pressure, but stress is one potential cause, experts say. annebaek/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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annebaek/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Leaving Segregated Neighborhoods Lowers Blacks' Blood Pressure

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Scientists Raise Concern By Wanting To Create Synthetic Human Genomes

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University of Washington

Life Expectancy Can Vary By 20 Years Depending On Where You Live

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The death rate for African-Americans dropped 25 percent over 17 years, but most of that was among people ages 65 and older. Dutchy/Getty Images hide caption

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Dutchy/Getty Images

Death Rate Among Black Americans Declines, Especially For Elderly People

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An illustration of a fetal lamb inside the "artificial womb" device, which mimics the conditions inside a pregnant animal. The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia hide caption

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The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Scientists Create Artificial Womb That Could Help Prematurely Born Babies

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A common blood test checks for elevated levels of prostate-specific antigens (PSA) in a man's blood, as an indicator that he may have prostate cancer. Renphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Renphoto/Getty Images

Federal Task Force Softens Opposition To Routine Prostate Cancer Screening

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EVATAR is a book-size lab system that can replicate a woman's reproductive cycle. Each compartment contains living tissue from a different part of the reproductive tract. The blue fluid pumps through each compartment, chemically connecting the various tissues. Courtesy of Northwestern University hide caption

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Courtesy of Northwestern University

Device Mimicking Female Reproductive Cycle Could Aid Research

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Embryoids like this one are created from stem cells and resemble very primitive human embryos. Scientists are studying them in hopes of learning more about basic human biology and development. Courtesy of Rockefeller University hide caption

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Courtesy of Rockefeller University

Colored scanning electron micrograph of baker's yeast, conventionally grown in the lab. So far, researchers have been able to synthesize six of the yeast's 16 chromosomes from scratch, and think they may be able to complete all 16 by 2018. Dennis Kunkel Microscopy/Science Source hide caption

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Dennis Kunkel Microscopy/Science Source

Scientists Closer To Creating A Fully Synthetic Yeast Genome

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Embryo Experiments On Human Development Raise Ethical Concerns

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A human embryo kept alive in the lab for 12 days begins to show signs of early development. The green cells seen here in the center would go on to form the body. This embryo is in the process of twinning, forming two small spheres out of one. Courtesy of Gist Croft, Cecilia Pellegrini, Ali Brivanlou/Rockefeller University hide caption

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Courtesy of Gist Croft, Cecilia Pellegrini, Ali Brivanlou/Rockefeller University

Embryo Experiments Reveal Earliest Human Development, But Stir Ethical Debate

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