Rob Stein i
Maggie Starbard/NPR
Rob Stein
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 25 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Association of Health Care Journalists.

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Testing for prostate cancer has declined after a recommendation in 2012 said it shouldn't be routine. iStockphoto hide caption

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Human stem cells, in this case made from adult skin cells, can give rise to any sort of human cell. Some scientists would like to insert such cells into nonhuman, animal embryos, in hopes of one day growing human organs for transplantation. Science Source hide caption

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Chris Nickels for NPR

Suicides and drug overdoses have contributed to a marked increase in the mortality rate for middle-aged whites. iStockphoto hide caption

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E-cigarettes work by heating up a fluid that contains the drug nicotine, producing a vapor that users inhale. The devices are most popular among young adults, ages 18 to 24, a federal survey indicates. iStockphoto hide caption

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The American Cancer Society has pushed back the age at which most women should begin having mammograms to 45. iStockphoto hide caption

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In addition to heart problems triggered by some supplements, emergencies often arise when kids swallow dietary supplements meant for adults, according to the CDC analysis, or when older adults choke on the pills. Lee Woodgate/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

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Image of a mini-kidney formed in a dish from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Minoru Takasato/Nature hide caption

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Ovarian tissue containing hundreds of small resting eggs is prepared to be transplanted back after cancer treatment. Courtesy of Claus Yding Andersen hide caption

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A surgical team at Sooam Biotech in Seoul, South Korea, injects cloned embryos into the uterus of an anesthetized dog. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Ken (left) and Henry were created using DNA plucked from a skin cell of Melvin, the beloved pet of Paula and Phillip Dupont of Lafayette, La. Edmund D. Fountain for NPR hide caption

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