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Rob Stein
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 25 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Association of Health Care Journalists.

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Life Expectancy In U.S. Drops For First Time In Decades, Report Finds

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He's more likely to get a timeout than a spanking. narvikk/Getty Images hide caption

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Spanking Young Children Declines Overall But Persists In Poorer Households

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Pfizer's Celebrex fared well in a safety study that compared the pain reliever with ibuprofen and naproxen. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Safety Of Painkiller Celebrex Affirmed In New Study

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A proposed change in work rules would let first-year residents care for patients for up to 28 hours without getting a chance to sleep. Thomas Northcut/Getty Images hide caption

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Medical Interns Could Work Longer Without A Break Under New Rule

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Teen Night Owls Struggle To Learn And Control Emotions At School

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Has The Human Life Span Hit The Ceiling?

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Yoshinori Ohsumi, a professor at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, smiles as he speaks with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on a phone during a press conference in Tokyo today, after he was awarded the Nobel Medicine Prize. Toru Yamanaka/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Japanese Biologist Wins Nobel Prize In Physiology Or Medicine

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Luz Barajas took her son Carlos Cholico to get his flu shot at Crawford Kids Clinic in Aurora, Colo., last year. Health officials say there is some evidence the flu shot is more protective than the nasal flu vaccine. Brent Lewis/The Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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New York Fertility Doctor Says He Created Baby With 3 Genetic Parents

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Swedish Scientist Starts DNA Experiments On Healthy Human Embryos

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Breaking Taboo, Swedish Scientist Seeks To Edit DNA Of Healthy Human Embryos

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Researchers Question Safety, Value Of Untested Stem Cell Treatments

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