Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Maggie Starbard/NPR
Rob Stein
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 25 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Association of Health Care Journalists.

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Scientists have created a treatment in which genetically modified T cells, shown in blue, can attack cancer cells, shown in red. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

FDA Approves First Gene Therapy For Leukemia

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This sequence of images shows the development of embryos formed after eggs were injected with both CRISPR, a gene-editing tool, and sperm from a donor with a genetic mutation known to cause cardiomyopathy. OHSU hide caption

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OHSU

Exclusive: Inside The Lab Where Scientists Are Editing DNA In Human Embryos

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The first sign of successful in vitro fertilization, after co-injection of a gene-correcting enzyme and sperm from a donor with a genetic mutation known to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Courtesy of OHSU hide caption

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Courtesy of OHSU

Scientists Precisely Edit DNA In Human Embryos To Fix A Disease Gene

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An international team of scientists analyzed data from men around the world and found sperm counts declining in Western countries. Hanna Barczyk for NPR hide caption

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Sperm Counts Plummet In Western Men, Study Finds

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FDA Announces Plan To Cut Level Of Nicotine Allowed In Cigarettes

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FDA Announces Plan To Cut Level Of Nicotine Allowed In Cigarettes

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FDA Announces Plan To Cut Level Of Nicotine Allowed In Cigarettes

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Image of a CAR-T cell (reddish) attacking a leukemia cell (green). These CAR-T lymphocytes are used for immunotherapy against cancer (CAR stands for chimeric antigen receptor). After the proliferation of the CAR-expressing T cells, they are transfused back into the patient and can directly detect the cancer cells carrying the antigen. Eye of Science/Science Source hide caption

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Eye of Science/Science Source

'Living Drug' That Fights Cancer By Harnessing Immune System Clears Key Hurdle

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In a new report, the CDC says U.S. doctors are prescribing fewer opioids than they were in 2010, but that overall rates remain high. Donald Gruener/iStockphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Donald Gruener/iStockphoto/Getty Images

Opioid Prescriptions Falling But Remain Too High, CDC Says

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News Brief: Cardinal Denies Sexual Assault Charges, Travel Ban Details

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A comprehensive study of air pollution in the U.S. finds it still kills thousands a year, and disproportionately affects poor people and minorities. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

U.S. Air Pollution Still Kills Thousands Every Year, Study Concludes

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Whole genome sequencing could become part of routine medical care. Researchers sought to find out how primary care doctors and patients would handle the results. Cultura RM Exclusive/GIPhotoStock/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive hide caption

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Cultura RM Exclusive/GIPhotoStock/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive

Routine DNA Sequencing May Be Helpful And Not As Scary As Feared

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The liquid used in e-cigarettes comes in fruit and candy flavors like cherry and peppermint. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Teens' Use Of E-Cigarettes Drops For The First Time, CDC Says

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