Maggie Starbard/NPR
Rob Stein
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 25 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Association of Health Care Journalists.

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Whole genome sequencing could become part of routine medical care. Researchers sought to find out how primary care doctors and patients would handle the results. Cultura RM Exclusive/GIPhotoStock/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive hide caption

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Cultura RM Exclusive/GIPhotoStock/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive

Routine DNA Sequencing May Be Helpful And Not As Scary As Feared

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The liquid used in e-cigarettes comes in fruit and candy flavors like cherry and peppermint. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Teens' Use Of E-Cigarettes Drops For The First Time, CDC Says

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Opana ER, a potent extended-release opioid, was approved by the FDA for pain management in 2006. But the agency says Endo's attempts to reformulate the pills to make them harder to crush, dissolve and inject have not been successful. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Fetuses in the third trimester responded more often to patterns that resembled faces than to patterns that did not. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

Fetuses Respond To Face-Like Patterns, Study Suggests

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A new study suggests that some small tumors are small because they are biologically prone to slow growth. Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images hide caption

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Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images

Some Small Tumors In Breasts May Not Be So Bad After All

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Nursing homes and hospitals need to work harder to keep water systems from being contaminated with bacteria that cause Legionnaires' disease, the CDC says. Getty Images hide caption

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A scientist holds a bioprosthetic mouse ovary made of gelatin with tweezers. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine hide caption

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Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Scientists One Step Closer To 3-D-Printed Ovaries To Treat Infertility

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It's not clear how living in a segregated neighborhood affects blood pressure, but stress is one potential cause, experts say. annebaek/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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annebaek/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Leaving Segregated Neighborhoods Lowers Blacks' Blood Pressure

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Scientists Raise Concern By Wanting To Create Synthetic Human Genomes

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University of Washington

Life Expectancy Can Vary By 20 Years Depending On Where You Live

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The death rate for African-Americans dropped 25 percent over 17 years, but most of that was among people ages 65 and older. Dutchy/Getty Images hide caption

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Death Rate Among Black Americans Declines, Especially For Elderly People

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An illustration of a fetal lamb inside the "artificial womb" device, which mimics the conditions inside a pregnant animal. The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia hide caption

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The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Scientists Create Artificial Womb That Could Help Prematurely Born Babies

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A common blood test checks for elevated levels of prostate-specific antigens (PSA) in a man's blood, as an indicator that he may have prostate cancer. Renphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Federal Task Force Softens Opposition To Routine Prostate Cancer Screening

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EVATAR is a book-size lab system that can replicate a woman's reproductive cycle. Each compartment contains living tissue from a different part of the reproductive tract. The blue fluid pumps through each compartment, chemically connecting the various tissues. Courtesy of Northwestern University hide caption

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Courtesy of Northwestern University

Device Mimicking Female Reproductive Cycle Could Aid Research

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