Leila Fadel Leila Fadel is NPR's international correspondent based in Cairo.

Leila Fadel

International Correspondent, Cairo

Leila Fadel is NPR's international correspondent based in Cairo.

Before joining NPR, she covered the Middle East for The Washington Post. In her role as Cairo Bureau Chief she reported on a wave of revolts and their aftermaths in Libya, Tunisia, Egypt, and Syria.

Prior to her position as Cairo Bureau Chief for the Post, she covered the Iraq war for nearly five years with Knight Ridder, McClatchy Newspapers and later the Washington Post. Her foreign coverage of the devastating human toll of the Iraq war earned her the George. R. Polk award in 2007.

Leila Fadel is a Lebanese-American journalist who speaks conversational Arabic and was raised in Saudi Arabia and Lebanon.

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Story Archive

Sofia Majed (from left), Samah Safiullah and Noa Turk assist Fatima Diallo as she navigates the ropes course. Maggie Starbard for NPR hide caption

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Maggie Starbard for NPR

Between Swimming And S'mores, Young Muslim Campers Learn To Cope With Rising Hate

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Taylor Swift Wins Groping Suit Against Ex-Radio Host

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Jury Rules In Favor Of Taylor Swift In Groping Lawsuit

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Jury Begins Deliberations In Taylor Swift Groping Trial

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Marcus Hutchins, seen in May when he was credited with hobbling the WannaCry attack. Now, U.S. authorities have arrested him for allegedly creating and distributing banking malware. Frank Augstein/AP hide caption

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Frank Augstein/AP

Muslims In The U.S. Face Increased Discrimination, PEW Report Says

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Reporting From Egypt On The Day 'There Was A Rip In The Fabric Of Society'

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Egyptian Woman Goes From Protests To Pizza

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Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi, a Muslim Brotherhood leader, chant slogans against the Egyptian military during a trial in which they were charged with violence in Alexandria, Egypt, on March 29, 2014. Thousands of Muslim Brotherhood supporters have been jailed by the current government. A former prisoner tells NPR he saw some turn to ISIS in prison. Heba Khamis/AP hide caption

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Heba Khamis/AP

As Egypt's Jails Fill, Growing Fears Of A Rise In Radicalization

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Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (in suit and green tie) inspects a police honor guard as he arrives at the parliament in Ankara on Friday. A July 15 coup attempt was quickly crushed in Turkey, a country that has had multiple military takeovers in the past. Burhan Ozbilici/AP hide caption

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Burhan Ozbilici/AP

A Turkish special forces police officer stands guard in front of the Istanbul Justice Palace on July 20. Family members of those detained have been gathering outside, hoping for a chance to see their loved ones. Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images

Fear Grips Turkey Amid Government Crackdown After Failed Coup

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People wave Turkish flags Tuesday as they gather in Taksim Square in Istanbul, protesting against the attempted coup last Friday. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

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Emrah Gurel/AP

Turkey's Post-Coup-Attempt Purge Widens As Arrests And Firings Grow

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Turkish police in the city of Mugla on Sunday detain members of the military suspected of involvement in Friday's attempted coup. Following the failed revolt, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's government has moved swiftly, detaining some 7,000 suspects, many in the military and the government. Tolga Adanali/AP hide caption

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Tolga Adanali/AP

Turkey's President Cracks Down After Failed Coup

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