Joel Rose

Correspondent, National Desk

Joel Rose covers the northeast for the National Desk out of NPR's New York bureau.

Rose's reporting often focuses on criminal justice, technology and culture. He's interviewed grieving parents after the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Connecticut, resettled refugees in Buffalo, and a lineup of musicians that includes Solomon Burke, Tom Waits and Arcade Fire.

Rose collaborated with NPR's Planet Money podcast for a story on smart guns. He was part of NPR's award-winning coverage of Pope Francis's visit to the US. He's also contributed to breakings news coverage of the mass shooting at Mother Bethel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath, and major protests after the deaths of Trayvon Martin in Florida and Eric Garner in New York.

Before coming to NPR, Rose held a number of jobs in public radio. He spent a decade in Philadelphia, including six years as a reporter at member station WHYY. He was also a producer at KQED in San Francisco and American Routes in New Orleans.

Rose has a bachelor's degree in history and music from Brown University, where he got his start in broadcasting as an overnight DJ at the college radio station. He lives in New Jersey with his wife and daughter.

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More Than 100 Arrested In Largest Gang Takedown In NYC History
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A bill in New York would allow police to examine drivers' phones to see whether they were using the device at the time of an accident. Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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New York Wants To Know: Have You Been Texting And Driving?
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New Jersey Transit has added audio and video surveillance to some of its trains for security reasons. Critics say it's an invasion of privacy. Joel Rose/NPR hide caption

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Your Conversation On The Bus Or Train May Be Recorded
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Supporters watch as New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks to promote his paid family leave initiative at a rally in Manhattan on March 10. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Paid Family Leave Advocates Celebrate A Big Week, But The Battle's Not Over
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Gun Lovers And Critics Agree: They're Not Sold On Smart Guns
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How An Idea To Develop A Safer, Smart Gun Backfired
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Despite Protests, Princeton To Keep Wilson's Name On School Buildings
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In his barn, Bertoia would play his sculptures for small invited audiences, or by himself late at night. His sculptures are in the barn where he left them when he died in 1978. John Brien/Important Records hide caption

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Sound Sculptor Harry Bertoia Created Musical, Meditative Art
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Mayor Don Guardian examines an artist's rendering of a boardwalk reconstruction project in October. Without a cash infusion, Guardian says all nonessential city services will shut down on April 8. Wayne Parry/AP hide caption

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Atlantic City Faces Financial Collapse, Cringes At State Takeover
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As Atlantic City Runs Out Of Money, State Legislature Floats Takeover Bill
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Bartender Sunny Balzano (left) transformed a longshoremen's bar in Red Hook, Brooklyn into a local institution. He's pictured above with Tim Sultan, who recounts Balzano's story in Sunny's Nights. Evan Sung hide caption

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Longtime Brooklyn Bartender Who Inspired 'Sunny's Nights' Has Died
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Apple Dispute Gets Personal: Encryption Debate Plays Out At Home
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New York Mayor Bill de Blasio recently unveiled details of his plan to build a streetcar connecting Brooklyn and Queens. Above is a rendering of the proposed streetcar line. Friends of Brooklyn Queens Connector hide caption

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Revived Streetcars May Be On Track For Disappointment
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The Seeds Of Apple's Standoff With DOJ May Have Been Sown In Brooklyn
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Bibimbap is one of the best-known Korean dishes. According to chef Deuki Hong and writer Matt Rodbard, there really isn't a definitive recipe. "The name translates to 'mixed rice,' and, in practice, rice is the dish's only constant," the authors write in their new cookbook, Koreatown. Courtesy of Clarkson Potter hide caption

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Welcome To 'Koreatown,' A Cookbook To Tempt American Taste Buds
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