Joel Rose

Reporter, National Desk

Joel Rose is a National Desk reporter based at NPR's New York Bureau.

Since joining NPR in 2011, Rose has covered the political, economic, and cultural life of the nation's biggest city. He's reported on the rise of the Occupy Wall Street movement, the fall of the compact disc, and the fast-changing fortunes of New York's elected officials. He's also contributed to NPR's coverage of the Trayvon Martin shooting in Florida, and the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal in Pennsylvania.

When pressing news doesn't keep him busy, Rose likes to report on the collision of the Internet and the entertainment industries, and to profile obscure musicians who should be more famous.

Rose has held a long list of jobs in public radio. Before coming to NPR, he spent ten years in Philadelphia, six of them as a reporter at NPR Member Station WHYY. He's also worked as a producer at KQED in San Francisco and American Routes in New Orleans. His writing has appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer, GOOD Magazine, and the Philadelphia Independent.

His radio reporting has won numerous awards, including a Golden Reel from the National Association of Community Broadcasters for his story about the unlikely comeback of soul singer Howard Tate.

Rose has a bachelor's degree in history and music from Brown University, where he got his start in radio as an overnight jazz DJ at the college station.

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The new building's window-lined hallways are in stark contrast to the brutalist design of the Whitney's former home. Nic Lehoux/Courtesy of the Whitney Museum of American Art hide caption

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Neil Portnow (left), president and CEO of The Recording Academy, talks with Lee Thomas Miller, head of the Nashville Songwriters Association International, at a music licensing hearing in 2014. Paul Morigi/WireImage for NARAS hide caption

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New Jersey's pension system is more than $80 billion in the red. Gov. Christie mostly blames past governors for sticking him with this bill. "I'm like the guy who showed up for dinner at dessert. ... And I got the check," he said earlier this year. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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The 71-year-old soul-singer Jerry Lawson had spent three months in a hospital due to an infected esophagus, and when got out, he wasn't sure how his voice would sound. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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A rabbi (center) supervises the production of Passover matzos at the Streit's factory on New York's Lower East Side, circa 1960s. This Passover will be Streit's last one at the landmark location. AP hide caption

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