Gregory Warner - 2015 i
Sana Krasikov
Gregory Warner - 2015
Sana Krasikov

Gregory Warner

International Correspondent, East Africa

Gregory Warner is NPR's East Africa Correspondent. His reports cover the diverse issues and voices of a region that is experiencing unparalleled economic growth as well as a rising threat of global terrorism. His coverage can be heard across NPR and NPR.org.

Before joining NPR, Warner was a senior reporter for American Public Media's Marketplace, where he endeavored to make the economics of American health care vivid and engaging. He's used puppets to illustrate the effects of Internet diagnoses on the doctor-patient relationship. He composed a Suessian cartoon to explain why health care job growth policies can increase the national debt. His musical journey into the shadow world of medical coding won the 2012 Best News Feature award from the Third Coast International Audio Festival.

Prior to Marketplace, Warner was a freelance radio producer reporting from conflict zones around the world. He climbed mountains with smugglers in Pakistan for This American Life, descended into illegal mineshafts in the Democratic Republic of Congo for Marketplace's "Working" series, and lugged his accordion across Afghanistan on the trail of the "Afghan Elvis" for NPR's Radiolab.

Warner's radio and multimedia work has won awards from Edward R Murrow, New York Festivals, AP, PRNDI, and a Sigma Delta Chi award from the Society of Professional Journalists. He has twice won Best News Feature from the Third Coast International Audio Festival in 2009 and 2012.

Warner earned his degree in English at Yale University. He is conversant in Arabic.

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Screengrab from the film, Present Tense.

The coffin of Theogene Niyondiko, who was shot dead by police during an opposition demonstration last Friday, is carried in Burundi's capital Bujumbura on Tuesday. Protesters have been demonstrating against President Pierre Nkurunziza, who plans to run for a third term next month. Gildas Ngingo/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Gildas Ngingo/AP

Traffic stands still in Nairobi. People in Kenya's capital don't like getting into cabs driven by strangers. They prefer to call drivers they know or who their friends recommend. Goran Tomasevic/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Goran Tomasevic/Reuters/Landov

Somali children dance in the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya. Fairfax Media/Fairfax Media via Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Fairfax Media/Fairfax Media via Getty Images

At the "Dinner in the Dark" restaurant that's just opened in Nairobi, a blind waiter leads guests to their table. The photo was taken during a training session — that's why the lights are on. Courtesy of is Eatout.co.ke hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of is Eatout.co.ke

The Amiri Red Sea was one of many boats ferrying refugees, including some Americans, escaping fighting in Yemen to nearby Djibouti, across the Gulf. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Gregory Warner/NPR

Hassan Farid, 23, was a medical resident at a big hospital in Yemen and is the son of a judge. It can be difficult and expensive to flee Yemen, and educated professionals are among the refugees who have reached the nearby African nation of Djibouti. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Gregory Warner/NPR