A man cleans up the site of Tuesday's car bomb explosion in Jos, Nigeria, on Thursday. The city was spared deadly reprisals, in part because a peace group intervened. Sunday Alamba/AP hide caption

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With Swift, Quiet Moves, Nigerian Group Limits Religious Violence

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Terrorist Group Suspected In Nigerian Attacks

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People attend a rally in Abuja, Nigeria, calling on the government to rescue kidnapped school girls. Sunday Alamba/AP hide caption

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Relatives Of Kidnapped Girls: Bring Them Back — But Alive

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The Mood In Abuja, Where Missing Schoolgirls Cast Long Shadow

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Nairobi Bombings Are A Sign Of Spreading Militant Influence

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A still image taken from a video that the extremist group Boko Haram says is of more than 100 girls who were abducted from a Nigerian school last month. Rebel kidnappings of girls has become increasingly common in African conflicts. AFP/YouTube hide caption

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Adad Hassan Jimali stands next to a sign for her private camp for displaced persons. The camp, which is in Mogadishu, Somalia, is called Nasiib Camp. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

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In Somalia, Collecting People For Profit

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With UN Chief In South Sudan, Warring Sides Agree To Talk

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In the Tomping United Nations base in Juba, South Sudan, roughly 20,000 people live under tents and plastic tarps. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

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South Sudan's Unrest Turns Politicians To Rebels, Tents To Homes

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In South Sudan, Peace Sought In Bringing Two Leaders Together

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Kerry Announces Progress Toward Peacekeeping Force In South Sudan

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Kerry Turns His Attention To South Sudan's Civil War

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Kenyan security officers rounded up people Friday as part of a crackdown that has swept up thousands of undocumented refugees, immigrants and Kenyan citizens of Somali descent in recent weeks. Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Somalis In Kenya Are Used To Raids, But They Say This Was Different

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