Mau Mau leader Gitu wa Kahengeri, right, poses with British High Commissioner to Kenya Christian Turner at the end of a news conference announcing the settlement last week. Ben Curtis/AP hide caption

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Britain Apologizes For Colonial-Era Torture Of Kenyan Rebels

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Reporter Donna Ali, 18, awaits her turn to go on air. Shabelle hires reporters as young as 15. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

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For Young Somali Journalists, Work Often Turns Deadly

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Secretary Kerry Urges U.S. Firms To Invest In Africa

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Kenyans watch a presentation at the "mobile apps garage showcase" this in Nairobi. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

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A black dehorned rhinoceros is followed by a calf at the Bona Bona Game Reserve in 2012. South Africa has seen a devastating increase in poaching in recent years as black-market demand for rhino horn has grown. Stephane de Sakutin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Can Economics Save The African Rhino?

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Mike Watson (left), CEO of Kenya's Lewa Conservancy, and conservationist Ian Craig identify the carcass of a 4-year-old black rhino named Arthur, whom poachers had killed the night before. The well-armed, well-informed poachers very likely used night vision goggles and a silencer on an AK-47. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

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The Enemy Inside: Rhino's Protectors Sometimes Aid Poachers

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Rhino Horns Fuel Deadly, Intercontinental Trade

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Elephants gather at dusk to drink at a watering hole in Kenya. Ben Curtis/AP hide caption

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To Count Elephants In The Forest, Watch Where You Step

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Eritrea's President Isaias Afwerki, shown on a visit to Libya in 2010, has been widely criticized by human rights groups. Eritrean exiles have organized passive protests, calling on people to stay home Friday. Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP hide caption

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With Robocalls, Eritrean Exiles Organize Passive Resistance

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787 Dreamliner Could Mean Big Things For Africa's 'Air Wars'

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Ugandan soldiers serving with the African Union Mission in Somalia prepare to advance on the central Somali town of Buur-Hakba. Stuart Price/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Western Money, African Boots: A Formula For Africa's Conflicts

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Gen. Bosco Ntaganda addresses a news conference in Kabati, a village located in Congo's North Kivu province, on Jan. 8, 2009. He showed up at the U.S. Embassy in Kigali on Monday and asked to be transferred to The Hague where is wanted on war crimes charges. Abdul Ndemere/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Abdul Ndemere/Reuters /Landov