Jan Scannell, former accountant, has taken on a new identity as "Jan Braai," a South African TV show host and media personality promoting the idea of National Braai (barbecuing) Day, celebrated each year on Sept. 24. Courtesy of Stephanus Rabie hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Stephanus Rabie

'Braai Day' Aims To Bring S. Africans Together Over Barbecue

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/214592906/215838772" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Embassy Attacks In Africa Permanently Changed U.S. Diplomacy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/209909009/209909011" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mekedes Getachew, 19, has been working at construction sites in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, since she was 15 years old. Except for the heaviest lifting, she says, the laborers "all do the same work and we don't really say this is a man's job, but when it comes to salary there's a difference." She earns $1.50 a day. Men earn $2. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Gregory Warner/NPR

For Ethiopian Women, Construction Jobs Offer A Better Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/207858449/209751948" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Why Gay Pride Celebrations In Uganda Were Discreet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/209110526/209110863" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Haleuya Habagaro says she always knew her coffee was exquisite. "When I roast the coffee, people come to ask where that strong fruity smell is coming from." Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Gregory Warner/NPR

How An Ethiopian Bean Became The Cinderella Of Coffee

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/202969075/204580853" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Richard Crompton sets his novel in 2007 Nairobi, a time when a small elite held power over an impoverished, restless majority. Nigel Pavitt/JAI/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption Nigel Pavitt/JAI/Corbis

In Nairobi, A Maasai Detective Pursues Elusive Justice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/203660903/204424770" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Mathare Valley, shown here in an aerial map, is one of the largest and oldest slums in Nairobi, Kenya. Residents are using hand-held GPS devices to map the area, which comprises 13 villages and is home to nearly 200,000 people. Courtesy of Muungano Support Trust and Jason Corburn, UC Berkeley hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Muungano Support Trust and Jason Corburn, UC Berkeley

In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/202656235/202874362" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

50 Years Ago, Raid Seals Mandela's Fate And His Fame

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/201017940/201017929" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Obama Promises Billions To Double Africa's Electricity Access

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/197713640/197713651" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

When Barack Obama was a U.S. senator in 2006, he visited Kenya, the homeland of his father. He's shown here planting a tree with Wangari Maathai, a Kenyan who won the Nobel Peace Prize. He is not stopping in Kenya on his current African tour, however, a decision that has upset many Kenyans. Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Investors, Businesses Hesitant To Set Up In Africa

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/197525599/197525584" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mau Mau leader Gitu wa Kahengeri, right, poses with British High Commissioner to Kenya Christian Turner at the end of a news conference announcing the settlement last week. Ben Curtis/AP hide caption

toggle caption Ben Curtis/AP

Britain Apologizes For Colonial-Era Torture Of Kenyan Rebels

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/189968998/190141005" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Reporter Donna Ali, 18, awaits her turn to go on air. Shabelle hires reporters as young as 15. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Gregory Warner/NPR

For Young Somali Journalists, Work Often Turns Deadly

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/177503511/188247487" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Secretary Kerry Urges U.S. Firms To Invest In Africa

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/186758392/186758389" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript