Gregory Warner 2012 i
Pearl Gabel /NPR
Gregory Warner 2012
Pearl Gabel /NPR

Gregory Warner

International Correspondent, East Africa

Gregory Warner is NPR's East Africa Correspondent. His reports cover the diverse issues and voices of a region that is experiencing unparalleled economic growth as well as a rising threat of global terrorism. His coverage can be heard across NPR and NPR.org.

Before joining NPR, Warner was a senior reporter for American Public Media's Marketplace, where he endeavored to make the economics of American health care vivid and engaging. He's used puppets to illustrate the effects of Internet diagnoses on the doctor-patient relationship. He composed a Suessian cartoon to explain why health care job growth policies can increase the national debt. His musical journey into the shadow world of medical coding won the 2012 Best News Feature award from the Third Coast International Audio Festival.

Prior to Marketplace, Warner was a freelance radio producer reporting from conflict zones around the world. He climbed mountains with smugglers in Pakistan for This American Life, descended into illegal mineshafts in the Democratic Republic of Congo for Marketplace's "Working" series, and lugged his accordion across Afghanistan on the trail of the "Afghan Elvis" for NPR's Radiolab.

Warner's radio and multimedia work has won awards from Edward R Murrow, New York Festivals, AP, PRNDI, and a Sigma Delta Chi award from the Society of Professional Journalists. He has twice won Best News Feature from the Third Coast International Audio Festival in 2009 and 2012.

Warner earned his degree in English at Yale University. He is conversant in Arabic.

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Dominic Ongwen, a Ugandan commander in warlord Joseph Kony's feared militia, waits for procedures to start at the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands, on Jan. 26. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Peter Dejong/AP

Dr Dieudonne Masemo Bihehe and Dr. Tina Amissi are physicians at Panzi Hospital in Bukavu, now doing research through ICART, a new research center to support Congolese scholarship. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Gregory Warner/NPR

Michael Sharp visits with Elizabeth Namavu and children in Mubimbi Camp, home to displaced persons in the Democratic Republic of Congo. A coordinator for the Mennonite Central, he has an unusual approach to peacemaking. Jana Asenbrennerova/Courtesy of MCC hide caption

itoggle caption Jana Asenbrennerova/Courtesy of MCC

Abebe, the owner of Abyssinia, a popular Ethiopian eatery in Nairobi, Kenya, shows some of the foods permitted during the pre-Christmas fast. Orthodox Ethiopians typically eat just one vegan meal per day for 40 days before the Christmas feast on Jan. 7. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Gregory Warner/NPR

Students in Uganda may use Uglish words, but you can be sure they're not learning them at school. Courtesy of Will R. Potter/Said&Seen hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Will R. Potter/Said&Seen

Najin, a female northern white rhino, gets a pat from keeper Mohamed Doyo. Najin, who lives at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya, is one of only five of its subspecies left in the world. Ben Curtis/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Ben Curtis/AP

Hundreds of Kenyan women and men took to the street on Nov. 17 after a video of an unidentified woman wearing a short skirt being stripped by a group of men emerged and went viral online, sparking the #MyDressMyChoice social media campaign. Dai Kurokawa/EPA/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Dai Kurokawa/EPA/Landov

Mumadou Traore says the Ivory Coast's French bureaucracy is a "blessing" when it comes to Ebola. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Gregory Warner/NPR