Kat Chow 2016
Ericka Cruz Guevarra/NPR
Kat Chow 2016
Ericka Cruz Guevarra/NPR

Kat Chow

Digital Journalist, Code Switch

Kat Chow is a founding member of NPR's Code Switch, an award-winning team that covers the complicated stories of race, ethnicity, and culture. She helps make new episodes for the Code Switch podcast, reports online features for Code Switch, and reports on-air pieces for NPR's shows like Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Her work has led readers and listeners on explorations of the gendered and racialized double standards surrounding double-eyelid surgery, as well as the mysterious origins of a so-called "Oriental" riff – a word she's also written a personal essay about. Much of her role revolves around finding new ways to build communities and tell stories, like @todayin1963 or #xculturelove.

During her tenure at NPR, Chow has also worked with NPR's show Invisibilia to develop a new digital strategy; reported for KERA in Dallas, Texas, as NPR's 2015 radio reporting fellow; and served on the selection committee for AIR Media's incubator project, Localore. Every now and then, she's a fourth chair on NPR's podcast Pop Culture Happy Hour. And sometimes, people ask her to talk about the work she does — at conferences in Amsterdam or Chicago, or at member stations in St. Paul or Louisville.

While a student at the University of Washington in Seattle, Chow wrote a food column for the Seattle Weekly, interned with the Seattle Times and worked on NBC's Winter Olympics coverage in Vancouver, B.C. You can find her tweeting for Code Switch at @NPRCodeSwitch and sharing her thoughts at @katchow.

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A police officer patrols during a protest in support of the Black Lives Matter movement in New York City on July 9. Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Letter From Young Asian-Americans To Their Families About Black Lives Matter

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The Code Switch Podcast Extra: No Words

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(Left) Hudson Yang in ABC's Fresh Off the Boat. (Center) Critic Jeff Yang. (Right) Margaret Cho in ABC's All American Girl. Eric McCandless/Getty Images; CNN/Courtesy of Jeff Yang; ABC Photo Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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On The Podcast: Rep Sweats, Or, 'I Don't Know If I Like This, But I Need It To Win'

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My 'Oriental' Father: On The Words We Use To Describe Ourselves

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How The Narrator Of 'Jane The Virgin' Found His Voice

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Ingrid Vaca, originally of Bolivia, rallies for immigration reform after marching to the White House on Nov. 20, 2015 — the one-year anniversary of President Obama's announcement concerning Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Rick Bayless is a master of Mexican cuisine. He's also a white guy from Oklahoma. Over the years, that has made him the target of criticism. Who gets to be the ambassador of a cuisine? Sergi Alexander/Getty Images hide caption

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