Hansi Lo Wang - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR
Hansi Lo Wang - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Hansi Lo Wang

Reporter, National Desk

Hansi Lo Wang is a National Desk reporter based at NPR's New York Bureau. He covers issues and events in the Northeast.

He previously reported on race, ethnicity and culture for NPR's Code Switch team. Since joining NPR in 2010 as a Kroc Fellow, he's contributed to NPR's breaking news coverage of the 2013 tornado in Moore, Okla., the trial of George Zimmerman in Florida and the Washington Navy Yard shooting. He has also reported for Seattle public radio station KUOW and worked behind the scenes of NPR's Weekend Edition as a production assistant.

In 2014, he won the National Journalism Award for General Excellence in Radio from the Asian American Journalists Association for his profile of a white member of a Boston Chinatown gang. He was also a finalist for a Salute to Excellence National Media Award from the National Association of Black Journalists.

A Philadelphia native, Wang speaks both Mandarin and Cantonese dialects of Chinese. As a student at Swarthmore College, he hosted, produced, and reported for a weekly podcast on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Leah Prevost, 21, works on a glass coil condenser at Salem Community College's Glass Education Center in Alloway, NJ. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Glassblowing Program Trains Students To Craft Tools For Science

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Police Continue Investigation Into Bombings In New York, New Jersey

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Suspect Tied To New York-Area Explosive Devices Now In Custody

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Person Of Interest In N.Y.-Area Bombs Tied To Family Restaurant In N.J.

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New York City Explosion Leaves At Least 29 Injured

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Mae Reeves and her husband Joel pose with her hats at Mae's Millinery in Philadelphia, circa 1953. Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift from Mae Reeves and her children, Donna Limerick and William Mincey, Jr. hide caption

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Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift from Mae Reeves and her children, Donna Limerick and William Mincey, Jr.

Mae Reeves' Hats Hang At National Museum Of African American History And Culture

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Pleasure boats are docked along the Erie Canal in Fairport, N.Y. Some are asking whether the canal is worth subsidizing now that it's no longer a major commercial waterway. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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A Piece Of The Past, A Price In The Present: Paying For The Erie Canal

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Russell Mercer replaces old U.S. flags with new ones at the Flushing World Trade Center Memorial at Flushing Cemetery in New York City. His stepson, Scott Kopytko, was killed on Sept. 11. Alex Welsh for NPR hide caption

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Alex Welsh for NPR

Sept. 11 Families Face 'Strange, Empty Void' Without Victims' Remains

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Three World Trade Center is under construction near One World Trade Center, which was completed in 2013. The new building stands 1,079 feet tall, and its topping-out ceremony was held in June. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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In Ongoing Rebuilding Of Ground Zero, A Balance Of Remembrance, Resilience

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Yoko Ono, John Lennon and their immigration attorney, Michael Wildes (right), leave the Immigration and Naturalization Service in New York City on March 16, 1972. Anthony Camerano/AP hide caption

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John Lennon's Deportation Fight Paved Way For Obama's Deferred Action Policy

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Motive Unclear In Killing Of Imam And Aide In New York

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At the 1936 Olympics, 18 black athletes went to Berlin as part of the U.S. team. Pictured here are (left to right, rear) high jumpers Dave Albritton and Cornelius Johnson; hurdler Tidye Pickett; sprinter Ralph Metcalfe; boxer Jim Clark; sprinter Mack Robinson. In front: weightlifter John Terry (left); long jumper John Brooks. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

Black U.S. Olympians Won In Nazi Germany Only To Be Overlooked At Home

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Inconsistencies Call Melania Trump's Immigration Story Into Question

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Fencer Ibtihaj Muhammad is set to become the first U.S. athlete to compete in the Olympics while wearing a hijab. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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An American Muslim Fencer Lunges Into U.S. Olympic History In Rio

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